empiricism


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em·pir·i·cism

(em-pir'i-sizm),
A looking to experience as a guide to practice or to the therapeutic use of any remedy.

empiricism

/em·pir·i·cism/ (em-pir´ĭ-sizm) skill or knowledge based entirely on experience.empir´icempir´ical

empiricism

(ĕm-pîr′ĭ-sĭz′əm)
n.
1. The view that experience, especially of the senses, is the only source of knowledge.
2.
a. Employment of empirical methods, as in science.
b. An empirical conclusion.
3. The practice of medicine that disregards scientific theory and relies solely on practical experience.

em·pir′i·cist n.

empiricism

[empir′isiz′əm]
a form of therapy based on the therapist's personal experience and that of other practitioners. empiricist, n.

empiricism,

n philosophical school in which theories must be based upon repeatable observations. Modern science has empiricism as its philosophical foundation.

empiricism

The belief that knowledge or behaviour stems from experience, learning or data acquired by observation or experimentation. See nativism; empiricist theory.

em·pir·i·cism

(em-pir'i-sizm)
Using experience as a guide to practice or use of any remedy.

empiricism

skill or knowledge based entirely on experience; compare with rationalism.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is significant that James does not define radical empiricism in terms of pluralism in either of these passages.
If there is a weakness to this book it is that although Bennett's claims are intellectually rich, his argument tends to rely on rather limited sampling--both in the scope of the book, by only addressing four works; and in the chapters, which address a few select moments rather than examining the tensions between empiricism and rationalism more comprehensively.
Romantic Empiricism begins such a discussion; other studies might perhaps, in the future, carry it on more fully.
In recognition of this change, later logical positivism is sometimes referred to by a different name, logical empiricism.
And his very laudable emphasis on material culture as an important stimulus to empiricism does not adequately explain Tycho Brahe's passion for establishing astronomy on an empirical footing, weakening the general application of his central thesis.
Fortunately, we are at the dawn of the greatest age of empiricism the world has ever known.
So how do we as a culture handle the conflict between empiricism and non-empiricism, and the worldviews they generate?
In the 1860s, scientists began to chaffe against the restrictions of the old empiricism and natural law and promote a creative and speculative version of scientific investigation.
The pieces reproduced at actual size here (and on the front and back covers of this issue) conjure for me the sympathetic prose of Maurice Maeterlinck's The Intelligence of Plants, the abstract empiricism of Karl Blossfeldt's photographs of botanical anatomy, and the structural intricacy of Bach.
The ability to calculate sizing performance with mathematical expressions should help to take some of the empiricism out of rosin sizing.
Weaver, and Russell Kirk are largely spurned or outrightly dismissed as irrelevant and impractical by a new generation of educational authorities whose gnostic ideas now go dangerously beyond the progressivist education and empiricism advanced in the thirties and forties by John Dewey.
The first merit of this remarkable defense of empiricism in ethics and economics is its frank status quaestionis and chosen perspective.