empiricism


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em·pir·i·cism

(em-pir'i-sizm),
A looking to experience as a guide to practice or to the therapeutic use of any remedy.

empiricism

/em·pir·i·cism/ (em-pir´ĭ-sizm) skill or knowledge based entirely on experience.empir´icempir´ical

empiricism

(ĕm-pîr′ĭ-sĭz′əm)
n.
1. The view that experience, especially of the senses, is the only source of knowledge.
2.
a. Employment of empirical methods, as in science.
b. An empirical conclusion.
3. The practice of medicine that disregards scientific theory and relies solely on practical experience.

em·pir′i·cist n.

empiricism

[empir′isiz′əm]
a form of therapy based on the therapist's personal experience and that of other practitioners. empiricist, n.

empiricism,

n philosophical school in which theories must be based upon repeatable observations. Modern science has empiricism as its philosophical foundation.

empiricism

The belief that knowledge or behaviour stems from experience, learning or data acquired by observation or experimentation. See nativism; empiricist theory.

em·pir·i·cism

(em-pir'i-sizm)
Using experience as a guide to practice or use of any remedy.

empiricism

skill or knowledge based entirely on experience; compare with rationalism.
References in periodicals archive ?
Van Fraassen somehow acknowledges the possibility of adopting an acception of "observable" as different from the one he uses within constructive empiricism (see 2008: 110).
If there is a weakness to this book it is that although Bennett's claims are intellectually rich, his argument tends to rely on rather limited sampling--both in the scope of the book, by only addressing four works; and in the chapters, which address a few select moments rather than examining the tensions between empiricism and rationalism more comprehensively.
These providers variably followed STI syndromic management guidelines received from pharmaceutical companies or practised personal empiricism.
Romantic Empiricism begins such a discussion; other studies might perhaps, in the future, carry it on more fully.
In the decades after World War I, various groups of scholars fiercely debated how to maintain a commitment to empiricism and objectivity, given the contemporary advancements in science noted above.
Cook credits the development of Descartes's materialism to his years spent in the merchant environment of the Netherlands and in particular to his early friendship with Isaac Beeckman, who also stimulated Pierre Gassendi's advocacy of atomism, probabilism, and empiricism.
Despite the ascending influence of empiricism during the nineteenth century, Husserl and Frege kept the notion of a purely conceptual philosophical analysis alive, an impulse which metamorphosed into linguistic analysis in the early twentieth century.
KEY WORDS: McDowell, appearings, empiricism, myth of the Given
Written for readers of all ages and backgrounds, Discovery of Motion offers a fascinating glimpse of "the big picture" of human understanding, with especial attention paid to principles of empiricism versus idealism.
According to McGinnis, we stand at the threshold of a new age of empiricism in which technology is dramatically reducing the costs of collecting, analyzing, and disseminating data.
By contrast, those Liberal pragmatists who could once be counted upon for constructive participation in policymaking have retired to their ivory towers, been consumed by post-modern theories that have caused them to "reject empiricism in favor of identity politics," and, as a result, have been in "denial of conservative control of social policy" and failed to provide an alternative to the obsolete paradigm that was the hallmark of the twentieth century.