empathy


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empathy

 [em´pah-the]
intellectual and emotional awareness and understanding of another person's thoughts, feelings, and behavior, even those that are distressing and disturbing. Empathy emphasizes understanding; sympathy emphasizes sharing of another person's feelings and experiences.

em·pa·thy

(em'pă-thē),
1. The ability to sense intellectually and emotionally the emotions, feelings, and reactions that another person is experiencing and to communicate that understanding to the person effectively. Compare: sympathy (3).
2. The anthropomorphization or humanization of objects and the feeling of oneself as being in and part of them.
[G. en (em), in, + pathos, feeling]

empathy

/em·pa·thy/ (em´pah-the) intellectual and emotional awareness and understanding of another's thoughts, feelings, and behavior.empath´ic

empathy

(ĕm′pə-thē)
n.
1. The ability to identify with or understand the perspective, experiences, or motivations of another individual or to comprehend and share another individual's emotional state.
2. In aesthetics, the projection of one's own feelings or thoughts on to something else, such as an object in work of art or a character in a novel or film.

empathy

[em′pəthē]
Etymology: Gk, en, in, pathos, feeling
the ability to recognize and to some extent share the emotions and states of mind of another and to understand the meaning and significance of that person's behavior. It is an essential quality for effective psychotherapy. Compare sympathy. empathic, adj., empathize, v.

em·pa·thy

(em'pă-thē)
1. The ability to sense the emotions, feelings, and reactions intellectually and emotionally that another person is experiencing and to communicate that understanding to the person effectively.
Compare: sympathy (3)
2. The anthropomorphization or humanizing of objects and the feeling of oneself as being in and part of them.

empathy

The state said to exist between two people when one is able to experience the same emotion as the other as a result of identical responses to an event and the adoption of an identical outlook.

em·pa·thy

(em'pă-thē)
Ability to sense intellectually and emotionally emotions, feelings, and reactions that another person is experiencing and it communicate.

empathy,

n the quality of putting oneself into the psychologic frame of reference of another, so that the other person's feeling, thinking, and acting are understood and to some extent predictable. A desirable trust-building characteristic of a helping profession. It is embodied in the sincere statement, “I understand how you feel.” Empathy is different from sympathy in that to be empathetic one understands how the person feels rather than actually experiencing those feelings, as in sympathy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Children need to have many opportunities to see how empathy can bring about peaceable solutions to interpersonal conflicts.
Vanatinai Islanders live in constant fear of sorcery, the categorical opposite of empathy, designed to undermine the personal autonomy that they prize.
The importance of empathy in the therapeutic alliance.
Environmental empathy in action occurs when people help save animals covered in oil from an oil spill.
While technology is absolutely essential to our delivery of nursing care, and we must be proficient in its use, we must remember that empathy cannot be delivered via a machine-only through the faces, words, and touch offered by nurses.
This Part surveys some of the literature related to empathy, not only to observe the numerous and subtle ways that scholars have explored empathy, but also to gain clarity about the specific understanding of empathy that can enhance students' emotional intelligence.
The program has the backing of the Assembly of First Nations which in 2008 passed a resolution to support and endorse Roots of Empathy, recognizing its compatibility with traditional First Nations teachings and worldviews.
We describe a theoretical framework for the initial development and pilot application of an empathy self-report instrument, the Empathy Assessment Index (EAI).
The process helps pupils to describe and understand their own feelings and those of others, raising levels of empathy among classmates and encouraging more respectful relationships.
During classroom visits, the Roots of Empathy instructor guides children in observing, considering and commenting on how the baby is feeling using toys, song, reading, artwork and discussion.
It has been used as a tool to confront and stop bullying in schools by teaching children empathy with others.
People who are high on affective empathy are often those who get quite fearful when watching a scary movie, or start crying during a sad scene.