empathy


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empathy

 [em´pah-the]
intellectual and emotional awareness and understanding of another person's thoughts, feelings, and behavior, even those that are distressing and disturbing. Empathy emphasizes understanding; sympathy emphasizes sharing of another person's feelings and experiences.

em·pa·thy

(em'pă-thē),
1. The ability to sense intellectually and emotionally the emotions, feelings, and reactions that another person is experiencing and to communicate that understanding to the person effectively. Compare: sympathy (3).
2. The anthropomorphization or humanization of objects and the feeling of oneself as being in and part of them.
[G. en (em), in, + pathos, feeling]

empathy

/em·pa·thy/ (em´pah-the) intellectual and emotional awareness and understanding of another's thoughts, feelings, and behavior.empath´ic

empathy

(ĕm′pə-thē)
n.
1. The ability to identify with or understand the perspective, experiences, or motivations of another individual or to comprehend and share another individual's emotional state.
2. In aesthetics, the projection of one's own feelings or thoughts on to something else, such as an object in work of art or a character in a novel or film.

empathy

[em′pəthē]
Etymology: Gk, en, in, pathos, feeling
the ability to recognize and to some extent share the emotions and states of mind of another and to understand the meaning and significance of that person's behavior. It is an essential quality for effective psychotherapy. Compare sympathy. empathic, adj., empathize, v.

em·pa·thy

(em'pă-thē)
1. The ability to sense the emotions, feelings, and reactions intellectually and emotionally that another person is experiencing and to communicate that understanding to the person effectively.
Compare: sympathy (3)
2. The anthropomorphization or humanizing of objects and the feeling of oneself as being in and part of them.

empathy

The state said to exist between two people when one is able to experience the same emotion as the other as a result of identical responses to an event and the adoption of an identical outlook.

em·pa·thy

(em'pă-thē)
Ability to sense intellectually and emotionally emotions, feelings, and reactions that another person is experiencing and it communicate.

empathy,

n the quality of putting oneself into the psychologic frame of reference of another, so that the other person's feeling, thinking, and acting are understood and to some extent predictable. A desirable trust-building characteristic of a helping profession. It is embodied in the sincere statement, “I understand how you feel.” Empathy is different from sympathy in that to be empathetic one understands how the person feels rather than actually experiencing those feelings, as in sympathy.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, this variation is not a result of DNA as no differences were observed in the genes that contribute to empathy in men and women.
When imagining a family member in a need situation, empathy predicts self-reported intent to help above and beyond oneness and negative affect.
Whether it was a biography or a textbook or a newspaper article, empathy was unchanged, and in some instances, it decreased.
With cognitive empathy, you understand what someone else is thinking and feeling, as when you relate to a character in a novel or take someone's perspective during a business negotiation.
In medical education several skills that contribute towards the health care delivery abilities are supposed to be strengthened by empathy and medical schools are increasingly aware of their role in the improvement of empathy of their students.
However, empathy cannot be cultivated because children are hard-wired for it.
In "The Anatomy of Empathy," Bloom enlists modern studies in brain science to confirm both those possibilities and those limits of empathy that he has already discerned on the basis of everyday experience.
Blair (2005) claimed that motor empathy should be included in an empathy scale, that is, unconsciously and/or automatically mirroring or mimicking the facial expression, voice, gesture, or even emotional experiences of another person (Dimberg & Thunberg, 2012).
Parenting and education author, and an expert on global education and literacy Homa Tavangar believes empathy starts with putting yourself in someone else's shoes; She wrote, "The key component is to understand a perspective that differs from your own" (2014).
Conclusion: Interventions during the educational journey about empathy had positive influence on students' personalities and their future practices.
Based on advances in the science of empathy, we suggest that limits on empathy are more apparent than real.