empathize

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Related to empathizer: empathising

empathize

 [em´pah-thīz]
to experience or feel empathy.

em·pa·thize

(em'pă-thīz),
To feel empathy in relation to another person; to put oneself in another's place.

empathize

(ĕm′pə-thīz′)
intr.v. empa·thized, empa·thizing, empa·thizes
To feel or experience empathy: empathized with the striking miners.

em′pa·thiz′er n.

em·pa·thize

(em'pă-thīz)
To feel empathy in relation to another person; to put oneself in another's place.

em·pa·thize

(em'pă-thīz)
To put oneself in another's place.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sometimes empathizers, such as those in the "helping professions," acquire a vested interest in the study, management, and perpetuation--as opposed to the solution and resulting disappearance--of sufferers' problems.
Finally, such an experience should instill in the empathizer both a sense of "knowing naivete" and humility in the face of such obvious limitations (126).
Baron-Cohen played a central role in establishing the theory of mind hypothesis, but his definition of empathizing seems tailored to the extreme-male-brain theory of autism: If CE is the first stage in empathizing and EE (or empathic concern) is the second stage, then people with a CE deficit may almost inevitably be identified as weak empathizers.
In the last study, participants negotiated a job hire, and once again the perspective-takers created more value and earned significantly more points for themselves than controls or the empathizers (who had the lowest score).
And the person without much natural empathy will never be able to comfort an agitated customer in the warm and sincere way that the great empathizers can.
All of the artists took a different approach, and there is no generation gap between the first-generation survivors and second-generation empathizers," said project curator Wendy Kaplan Friend of Tarzana, adding that the result is art both "phenomenal and emotionally stirring.
He believes that men are, "on average," wired to be better systematizers and women to be better empathizers.
And now we're progressing yet again -- to a society of creators and empathizers, of pattern recognition and meaning makers.