empathy

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Related to empathically: empathy, empathise

empathy

 [em´pah-the]
intellectual and emotional awareness and understanding of another person's thoughts, feelings, and behavior, even those that are distressing and disturbing. Empathy emphasizes understanding; sympathy emphasizes sharing of another person's feelings and experiences.

em·pa·thy

(em'pă-thē),
1. The ability to sense intellectually and emotionally the emotions, feelings, and reactions that another person is experiencing and to communicate that understanding to the person effectively. Compare: sympathy (3).
2. The anthropomorphization or humanization of objects and the feeling of oneself as being in and part of them.
[G. en (em), in, + pathos, feeling]

empathy

/em·pa·thy/ (em´pah-the) intellectual and emotional awareness and understanding of another's thoughts, feelings, and behavior.empath´ic

empathy

(ĕm′pə-thē)
n.
1. The ability to identify with or understand the perspective, experiences, or motivations of another individual or to comprehend and share another individual's emotional state.
2. In aesthetics, the projection of one's own feelings or thoughts on to something else, such as an object in work of art or a character in a novel or film.

empathy

[em′pəthē]
Etymology: Gk, en, in, pathos, feeling
the ability to recognize and to some extent share the emotions and states of mind of another and to understand the meaning and significance of that person's behavior. It is an essential quality for effective psychotherapy. Compare sympathy. empathic, adj., empathize, v.

em·pa·thy

(em'pă-thē)
1. The ability to sense the emotions, feelings, and reactions intellectually and emotionally that another person is experiencing and to communicate that understanding to the person effectively.
Compare: sympathy (3)
2. The anthropomorphization or humanizing of objects and the feeling of oneself as being in and part of them.

empathy

The state said to exist between two people when one is able to experience the same emotion as the other as a result of identical responses to an event and the adoption of an identical outlook.

em·pa·thy

(em'pă-thē)
Ability to sense intellectually and emotionally emotions, feelings, and reactions that another person is experiencing and it communicate.

empathy,

n the quality of putting oneself into the psychologic frame of reference of another, so that the other person's feeling, thinking, and acting are understood and to some extent predictable. A desirable trust-building characteristic of a helping profession. It is embodied in the sincere statement, “I understand how you feel.” Empathy is different from sympathy in that to be empathetic one understands how the person feels rather than actually experiencing those feelings, as in sympathy.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the next exchange, the counselor empathically responds to the client's communication without implying agreement.
Mary, after responding empathically, returned to the issue of Bill's dress.
Free debate will help both sides to empathically understand each other's position.
As one researcher has said: "For clinicians to empathically recognise and clinically respond to disability in their patients, they need to begin by recognising and responding to disability within themselves and within their own ranks, rather than continuing to uphold impossible ideals of health and normalcy.
Having socially connected with facility workers, chimps reacted empathically to human strangers who yawned, the researchers propose.
His response suggested strongly to me that I was dealing with a formidable cultural warrior with an ability to absorb empathically not only the core things that divide him and others at the points of departure but also the core things that potentially or presumably unify him and others relative to the ends of humanity: such ends as social and economic justice and freedom of humans to be themselves for the clear benefit of one another and their communities.
6) People form their conceptions of character by this process of observation, and it is through watching others that we come to define our own identities; by seeing someone experiencing pain, pleasure, love, envy, or hatred and empathically connecting with them, we feel their emotions and subject position, and in the process we become more like them.
I am using the narrative of Bonhoeffer's New York transformation to illustrate my claim that the Christian ethics we derive from a hermeneutic of Jesus can aid in the struggle against oppression and injustice only when we are capable, like Bonhoeffer, of overcoming our biases and empathically entering into the situation of another with the ability to reflect on the other's experience.
Having that mindset allows one to listen empathically in order to correct misunderstandings, gain a deeper understanding of the other person, convey that understanding, move to peeling away the layers of the problem to reach a resolution.
Other writers experience cultural immersion when they choose to suspend identity to empathically experience another culture.
To become part of the story we need to listen deeply, empathically, curious as to why the Other sees the world differently than we do (and even identical twins do); open to whatever we might learn in the process, accepting of the Other whoever or whatever they might turn out to be (particularly if they turn out to be someone other than the person we wanted), and always compassionate towards them (Siegel, 2007).
By making an empathic guess about her needs, even when you don't like the strategy she's taking to meet those needs, you can connect empathically with her humanity instead of seeing her as the problem or the enemy.