empathic


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em·path·ic

(em-path'ik), Avoid the incorrect form empathetic.
Relating to or marked by empathy.

empathic

[empath′ik]
Etymology: Gk, en, into, pathos, feeling
pertaining to or involving the entering of one person into the emotional state of another while remaining objective and distinctly separate.

em·path·ic

(em-path'ik)
Relating to or marked by empathy.

em·path·ic

(em-path'ik) Avoid the incorrect form empathetic.
Relating to or marked by empathy.
References in periodicals archive ?
We believe that certainly memory enhancements were necessary for the transition into empathic and abstract thinking, as well as complex forms of planning (Coolidge and Wynn, 2016).
By mapping ratings of empathy to these ratings of more basic feelings, the researchers found that empathic care was associated with both happy and sad feelings, while empathic distress encompasses generally negative feelings of sadness, anger, fear, and disgust.
The trick is to be able to take that initial empathic response and shift into compassion.
None of the previous studies regarding impacts of FLE on cognition and emotion processing have examined relationship between PCF and components of empathic abilities in FLE.
The results of this study may assist clinicians to recognize patients at risk for stroke not receiving supportive FC empathic responses by evaluating FC mood states (anger, fatigue, depression) that can impact their empathic helping.
Data were collected using the Nurse Identification Form, the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), and the Empathic Tendency Scale (ETS).
There is some evidence that those who are grandiose in nature have deficits in their empathic ability (Vonk, Zeigler-Hill, Mayhew & Mercer, 2013).
This sample also represented a highly relevant group for which to test empathic accuracy, given the importance of empathic accuracy for a host of workplace outcomes, including negotiations,worker satisfaction,and workplace performance, the authors write.
It is demonstrating your empathic understanding to the other person.
2012) conducted a qualitative descriptive study to gain insight into the use of empathy sessions and their impact on empathic abilities.
Rogers (1951) provided a comprehensive framework for understanding human development, psychological maladjustment, and personality change in his 19 propositions (Ray, 2011; Wilkins, 2010), and Rogers (1957) described the environment necessary for constructive personality change to occur when he outlined six necessary and sufficient conditions for therapy: (a) The therapist and the client are in psychological contact, (b) the client experiences incongruence, (c) the therapist is congruent in the relationship, (d) the therapist experiences unconditional positive regard (UPR) toward the client, (e) the therapist experiences and communicates empathic understanding toward the client, and (f) the client perceives the therapist's UPR and empathic understanding.