empathy

(redirected from empathetic)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

empathy

 [em´pah-the]
intellectual and emotional awareness and understanding of another person's thoughts, feelings, and behavior, even those that are distressing and disturbing. Empathy emphasizes understanding; sympathy emphasizes sharing of another person's feelings and experiences.

em·pa·thy

(em'pă-thē),
1. The ability to sense intellectually and emotionally the emotions, feelings, and reactions that another person is experiencing and to communicate that understanding to the person effectively. Compare: sympathy (3).
2. The anthropomorphization or humanization of objects and the feeling of oneself as being in and part of them.
[G. en (em), in, + pathos, feeling]

empathy

/em·pa·thy/ (em´pah-the) intellectual and emotional awareness and understanding of another's thoughts, feelings, and behavior.empath´ic

empathy

(ĕm′pə-thē)
n.
1. The ability to identify with or understand the perspective, experiences, or motivations of another individual or to comprehend and share another individual's emotional state.
2. In aesthetics, the projection of one's own feelings or thoughts on to something else, such as an object in work of art or a character in a novel or film.

empathy

[em′pəthē]
Etymology: Gk, en, in, pathos, feeling
the ability to recognize and to some extent share the emotions and states of mind of another and to understand the meaning and significance of that person's behavior. It is an essential quality for effective psychotherapy. Compare sympathy. empathic, adj., empathize, v.

em·pa·thy

(em'pă-thē)
1. The ability to sense the emotions, feelings, and reactions intellectually and emotionally that another person is experiencing and to communicate that understanding to the person effectively.
Compare: sympathy (3)
2. The anthropomorphization or humanizing of objects and the feeling of oneself as being in and part of them.

empathy

The state said to exist between two people when one is able to experience the same emotion as the other as a result of identical responses to an event and the adoption of an identical outlook.

em·pa·thy

(em'pă-thē)
Ability to sense intellectually and emotionally emotions, feelings, and reactions that another person is experiencing and it communicate.

empathy,

n the quality of putting oneself into the psychologic frame of reference of another, so that the other person's feeling, thinking, and acting are understood and to some extent predictable. A desirable trust-building characteristic of a helping profession. It is embodied in the sincere statement, “I understand how you feel.” Empathy is different from sympathy in that to be empathetic one understands how the person feels rather than actually experiencing those feelings, as in sympathy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cycling efficiently between the analytical network and the empathetic network can help you deal with business setbacks, avoid reacting too aggressively or fearfully in a negotiation, or understand when compromise will lead to a better outcome than conflict.
Which would you rather assess and teach--navigation skills or an empathetic nature?
Loyal, chivalrous, empathetic and romantic are traits not often used when creating African American male characters.
It's difficult in this society to maintain an empathetic perspective, especially when dealing with the American tendency to turn debates into "us vs.
Jiricna's empathetic response to her clients' wishes, her concern for the interior of buildings and the way they function, is extraordinary.
Observing their manners of communication and mediation as well as their dialogues offers nurses insight into the development of effective and empathetic skills.
When delivered in a gentle, sincere manner, this empathetic approach projects acceptance of suspects as "good" individuals who have experienced devastating events.
Julius Chambers, the former NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund executive director, concurs: "There is a need for appointments of people to the bench who are empathetic to the way minorities, women and other disadvantaged folks have been treated.
Said rape scene is anything but graphic or exploitative, and is an emotional fulcrum point in a loss-of-innocence tale of stunningly empathetic power.
The more socially comfortable participants performed well on the empathetic task regardless of whether they were on oxytocin or placebo.
An empathetic and involving true story of family values.
Jackie Earle Haley (``Little Children''): Empathetic portrayal of a creepy sexual deviant.