empathy

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empathy

 [em´pah-the]
intellectual and emotional awareness and understanding of another person's thoughts, feelings, and behavior, even those that are distressing and disturbing. Empathy emphasizes understanding; sympathy emphasizes sharing of another person's feelings and experiences.

em·pa·thy

(em'pă-thē),
1. The ability to sense intellectually and emotionally the emotions, feelings, and reactions that another person is experiencing and to communicate that understanding to the person effectively. Compare: sympathy (3).
2. The anthropomorphization or humanization of objects and the feeling of oneself as being in and part of them.
[G. en (em), in, + pathos, feeling]

empathy

/em·pa·thy/ (em´pah-the) intellectual and emotional awareness and understanding of another's thoughts, feelings, and behavior.empath´ic

empathy

(ĕm′pə-thē)
n.
1. The ability to identify with or understand the perspective, experiences, or motivations of another individual or to comprehend and share another individual's emotional state.
2. In aesthetics, the projection of one's own feelings or thoughts on to something else, such as an object in work of art or a character in a novel or film.

empathy

[em′pəthē]
Etymology: Gk, en, in, pathos, feeling
the ability to recognize and to some extent share the emotions and states of mind of another and to understand the meaning and significance of that person's behavior. It is an essential quality for effective psychotherapy. Compare sympathy. empathic, adj., empathize, v.

em·pa·thy

(em'pă-thē)
1. The ability to sense the emotions, feelings, and reactions intellectually and emotionally that another person is experiencing and to communicate that understanding to the person effectively.
Compare: sympathy (3)
2. The anthropomorphization or humanizing of objects and the feeling of oneself as being in and part of them.

empathy

The state said to exist between two people when one is able to experience the same emotion as the other as a result of identical responses to an event and the adoption of an identical outlook.

em·pa·thy

(em'pă-thē)
Ability to sense intellectually and emotionally emotions, feelings, and reactions that another person is experiencing and it communicate.

empathy,

n the quality of putting oneself into the psychologic frame of reference of another, so that the other person's feeling, thinking, and acting are understood and to some extent predictable. A desirable trust-building characteristic of a helping profession. It is embodied in the sincere statement, “I understand how you feel.” Empathy is different from sympathy in that to be empathetic one understands how the person feels rather than actually experiencing those feelings, as in sympathy.
References in periodicals archive ?
If you have the trust of customers, and you're empathetic down to your DNA, you'll be well on your way to a customer-engaged culture.
Incredible changes in treatment outcomes can be observed with empathetic behavior.
Borba asserts that the demonstration of kindness is necessary in order to help strengthen the empathetic bonds being developed in children.
The only way tor trauma survivors to heal their psychological wounds, ii healing happens at all, is tor there to be a fully engaging and empathetic listener lose job is to help the survivors integrate and make sense of their disorient ii g and unbearable experiences.
Empathetic statements such as "It must be hard to imagine that your daughter has a disability when she seems to be developing normally to you" are appropriate.
It is a kind of "passion", which is why the empathetic are often moved to "compassion".
She was also capable of working on a more empathetic level, with direct access to emotion.
There are five modes of listening: Ignoring, pretending, selectively listening, attentive listening, and empathetic listening.
No one knows exactly why people yawn contagiously, but recent research suggests that the roughly 50 percent of adult humans who do it are more empathetic than those who don't.
Stripped of the obscurity he'd need in order to wage sneak-attack interviews, he's better off staying outside the frame, assembling his case with the aid of talking beads, unreleased news footage, and empathetic small-scale studies of the individuals affected by large-scale U.
Smith's icon of suffering engages the viewer in an empathetic recall of past wrongs, from environmental degradation to cultural annihilation through, among other causes, the spread of disease.
These youth are thoughtful enough to have developed a more international perspective and empathetic enough to have made an effort to put themselves in others' shoes.