empacho

empacho

A folk illness described in Central America which, while defined as obstruction of the stomach and/or intestine, is understood to mean indigestion or GI malaise, resulting in abdominal pain and bloating, and variably accompanied by nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea and lethargy.

empacho

(em-pa'cho) [Sp., surfeit, impacted stomach]
A culture-based syndrome of gastrointestinal distress in infants and children ascribed to intestinal blockage, whose symptoms may include bloating, diarrhea, vomiting, and lethargy. In some Latin American cultures, empacho is treated by a folk practitioner, who may use external massage or internal treatments, including herbal teas, commercial laxatives, or olive or castor oil. Some traditional treatments use mercury compounds or lead salts, which may poison affected infants. See: curanderismo

empacho (em·päˑ·chō),

n an ethnomedical condition common to Latin America in which the bowel or stomach is thought to be blocked by saliva, soft food such as chewing gum, or hard-to-digest foods like popcorn hulls. Cures consist of massage, popping the back, purgative herbal teas, and occasionally dangerous treatments with heavy metals such as lead or mercury. Also called
tripida.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although there are several folk ailments, among the most common are Empacho, Susto, Caida de la Mollera, and Mal de Ojo.
In Mexico and Central America, this includes compadrazgo, fatalismo, machismo and folk etiologies (susto, empacho, caida de mollera, ojo, etc.
Physical categories include bilis (rage), with ailments aggravated by our frenetic fight-or-flight lifestyles; empacho (blockage), associated with digestive disorders, as well as emotional blocks; and mal aire (bad air), causing ailments in children such as earaches or chills.
The oral use of mercury to treat indigestion, or empacho, in some Hispanic populations is also a source of exposure.
Por eso, no tuvo empacho en manifestar que era necesario imitar a los Estados Unidos en lo que "tienen de bueno y de fecundo" a nivel institucional, y como complemento aceptaba el programa de Eduardo Asquerino en torno a una linea permanente y numerosa de barcos entre Espana y Cuba, y de alli a todos los puertos hispanoamericanos; tambien compartia la idea de crear un cable telegrafico entre Cadiz, Canarias, Puerto Rico y Cuba; franquicias aduaneras y postales entre Espana y America con centro en Cuba; el establecimiento de consulados de todas las republicas en los puertos cubanos y la organizacion de un Congreso Hispano-Americano.
Empacho is a condition that can be explained as a ball of food getting stuck in the stomach or a feeling of indigestion.
Mexican-Americans take it orally to relieve empacho (indigestion), especially in infants and children.
Some of the most common culture-bound syndromes described among Latinos include empacho (stomach ailment), susto (fright), caida de mollera (fallen fontanelle), mal de ojo (evil eye), bilongo/hechizo (hex), ataques de nervios (attack of the nerves), and envidia (envy) (Spicer, 1977; Trotter, 1981).
Entre la multitud de aspectos que podria haber seleccionado de la India, se detiene, anota y reflexiona una y otra vez sobre el excremento humano que ensucia calles, playas, riberas de los rios, campos y caminos, poblando su relato de figuras quebradas por la cintura, hombres, mujeres, adultos y ninos, que sin empacho alguno y a la vista de todos defecan por doquier.
Even more alarmingly, some santeros prescribe ingested mercury for infants with empacho, or constipation, believing that the mercury will dislodge food blockages.
Empacho in four Latino groups: A study of intra- and inter-cultural variation in beliefs.
While lead-based treatments usually are not the first line of defense, he found families often administer several "fingertip"-sized doses of lead compounds daily when other empacho remedies fail.