emotion

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emotion

 [e-mo´shun]
a state of arousal characterized by alteration of feeling tone and by physiologic behavioral changes. The external manifestation of emotion is called affect; a pervasive and sustained emotional state, mood. adj., adj emo´tional. The physical form of emotion may be outward and evident to others, as in crying, laughing, blushing, or a variety of facial expressions. However, emotion is not always reflected in one's appearance and actions even though psychic changes are taking place. Joy, grief, fear, and anger are examples of emotions.

e·mo·tion

(ē-mō'shŭn),
A strong feeling, aroused mental state, or intense state of drive or unrest, which may be directed toward a definite object and is evidenced in both behavior and in psychological changes, with accompanying autonomic nervous system manifestations.
[L. e-moveo, pp. -motus, to move out, agitate]

emotion

/emo·tion/ (e-mo´shun) a strong feeling state, arising subjectively and directed toward a specific object, with physiological, somatic, and behavioral components.emo´tional

emotion

(ĭ-mō′shən)
n.
1. A mental state that arises spontaneously rather than through conscious effort and is often accompanied by physiological changes; a feeling: the emotions of joy, sorrow, and anger.
2. Such mental states or the qualities that are associated with them, especially in contrast to reason: a decision based on emotion rather than logic.

emotion

[imō′shən]
Etymology: L, emovere, to disturb
1 the outward expression or display of mood or feeling states.
2 the affective aspect of consciousness as compared with volition and cognition. Physiological alterations often occur with a marked change of emotion regardless of whether the feelings are conscious or unconscious, expressed or unexpressed. See also emotional need, emotional response.

emotion

Psychology A mood, affect or feeling of any kind–eg, anger, excitement, fear, grief, joy, hatred, love. See Negative emotion, Positive emotion, Toxic emotion.

e·mo·tion

(ē-mō'shŭn)
A strong feeling, aroused mental state, or intense state of drive or unrest directed toward a definite object and evidenced in both behavior and in psychologic changes, with accompanying autonomic nervous system manifestations.
[L. e-moveo, pp. -motus, to move out, agitate]

emotion

Any state of arousal in response to external events or memories of such events that affect, or threaten to affect, personal advantage. Emotion is never purely mental but is always associated with bodily changes such as the secretion of ADRENALINE and cortisol and their effects. The limbic system and the hypothalamus of the brain are the mediators of emotional expression and feeling. The external expression of emotional content is known as ‘affect’. Repressed emotions are associated with psychosomatic disease. The most important, in this context, are anger, a sense of dependency, and fear.

emotion

a short-term positive or negative affective state. Typically differentiated from mood in that an emotion is of shorter duration and evoked in response to a specific event, such as anger.

e·mo·tion

(ē-mō'shŭn)
A strong feeling, aroused mental state, or intense state of drive or unrest, which may be directed toward a definite object.
[L. e-moveo, pp. -motus, to move out, agitate]

emotion,

n a complex feeling or state (affect) accompanied by characteristic motor and glandular activities; feelings; mood.

emotion

aroused state involving intense feeling, autonomic activation and related behavior. Animals have emotions insofar as they are motivated to behave by what they perceive and much of the reaction is learned rather than intuitive. The reactions are based on rewarding and adversive properties of stimuli from the external environment. The center for the control of emotional behavior is the limbic system of the brain.

Patient discussion about emotion

Q. Emotions My 68 years-old husband underwent his surgery for lung cancer several moths ago and after that received chemo. Thankfully, it seems that he’s on the right track, but then lately he’s being very emotional. He says he’s always been this way since the diagnosis, but he just hid it. We try to talk about it, but it seems we just don’t communicate. Any advice?

A. Hi,
Those above me already phrased very well what I wanted to write, so I’ll add a link to a site I found about this subject:
http://www.cancer.org/docroot/MBC/MBC_4x_Anxiety.asp?sitearea=MBC

Take care!

Q. What role does emotion have in the life of someone with autism? I just find the whole disorder of autism hard to understand because I'm a really emotional person. I'm especially interested in how people with mild autism or Asperger's can function fine but then when it comes to feeling empathy they have such trouble. I guess my question is how such people experience emotion--are these people actually unable to care about others? My intention is not to sound ignorant, I'm genuinely curious.

A. I have asperger's and most everything for me is logically analyzed and I have a difficulty knowing what emotion goes with certain situations and how the emotion manifests itself within me.
I care about others, I just cannot always put myself in their shoes and feel what they are feeling.

Q. discussing my father situation with the doctor My 82 years old dad has dementia, and currently lives with us at my home. For the last few weeks he's very nervous and sometimes yells and screams at us. I want to take him to the doctor and see if he can get any help, but I'm afraid that if I'll try to speak with doctor about this subject in front of my dad he'll take offense. What can I do? Thank you very much!

A. The answer above is a good suggestion. I would add to the letter a small warning about the way your father would react to a discussion of his behaviour so the doctor would know to discuss it carefully.

More discussions about emotion
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