emotional

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e·mo·tion·al

(ē-mō'shŭn-ăl),
Relating to or marked by an emotion.

emotional

(ĭ-mō′shə-nəl)
adj.
1. Of or relating to emotion: an emotional illness; emotional crises.
2. Readily affected with or stirred by emotion: an emotional person who often weeps.
3. Arousing or intended to arouse the emotions: an emotional appeal.
4. Marked by or exhibiting emotion: an emotional farewell.

e·mo′tion·al′i·ty (-shə-năl′ĭ-tē) n.
e·mo′tion·al·ly adv.

e·mo·tion·al

(ē-mō'shŭn-ăl)
Relating to or marked by an emotion.

e·mo·tion·al

(ē-mō'shŭn-ăl)
Relating to or marked by an emotion.

emotional,

adj describing a person experiencing an emotion; manifesting emotional behavior, rather than logical, rational behavior; describing a person who is easily or excessively given to emotion.

Patient discussion about emotional

Q. Emotions My 68 years-old husband underwent his surgery for lung cancer several moths ago and after that received chemo. Thankfully, it seems that he’s on the right track, but then lately he’s being very emotional. He says he’s always been this way since the diagnosis, but he just hid it. We try to talk about it, but it seems we just don’t communicate. Any advice?

A. Hi,
Those above me already phrased very well what I wanted to write, so I’ll add a link to a site I found about this subject:
http://www.cancer.org/docroot/MBC/MBC_4x_Anxiety.asp?sitearea=MBC

Take care!

Q. What role does emotion have in the life of someone with autism? I just find the whole disorder of autism hard to understand because I'm a really emotional person. I'm especially interested in how people with mild autism or Asperger's can function fine but then when it comes to feeling empathy they have such trouble. I guess my question is how such people experience emotion--are these people actually unable to care about others? My intention is not to sound ignorant, I'm genuinely curious.

A. I have asperger's and most everything for me is logically analyzed and I have a difficulty knowing what emotion goes with certain situations and how the emotion manifests itself within me.
I care about others, I just cannot always put myself in their shoes and feel what they are feeling.

Q. discussing my father situation with the doctor My 82 years old dad has dementia, and currently lives with us at my home. For the last few weeks he's very nervous and sometimes yells and screams at us. I want to take him to the doctor and see if he can get any help, but I'm afraid that if I'll try to speak with doctor about this subject in front of my dad he'll take offense. What can I do? Thank you very much!

A. The answer above is a good suggestion. I would add to the letter a small warning about the way your father would react to a discussion of his behaviour so the doctor would know to discuss it carefully.

More discussions about emotional
References in periodicals archive ?
These emotionalized, subliminal pointers are what have conjured loud applause in American venues, from the upstate movie theater I sat in last night to the standing ovation in Artforum.
The purpose of the editors is to de-emphasize the "feminization thesis" (the idea that in the modern era, faith became a feminine quality and Christianity the cultural territory of women, and therefore socially sentimentalized, emotionalized, and devalued).
Example of coding according to the four categories of the 7-scale model Article Scale Category Description Elton's Detailed 2 Identified deceased, some ex- versus details of the situation, boyfriend indirect no picture threw himself Natural vs 4 Alleged suicide under a violent car death Impending 4 Real casualty took place versus happened death One death 1 One individual died versus many Proximity 3 Death is distant, but emotionalized during reporting Death long 2 Death occurred some ago versus time ago recent death Death of 3 Death of member of the an general public influential person versus death of other than human Table 4.
But are they more fallible than emotionalized credulity?
154) Whether we view modernity, with Max Weber, as "the demythification and dischantment of the social world," or with Benjamin, as the oppressive and dehumanizing remythification of social forms, (155) the "disenchantment with life" so pervasive in the public discourse of urban Russia can be seen as an emotionalized interpretation of this history.