emotionalism


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emotionalism

(ĭ-mō′shə-nə-lĭz′əm)
n.
1. The tendency to display emotion freely or to rely on or place too much value on emotion.
2. Undue display of emotion.
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Here, one cannot help but recall Hanslick's argument against emotionalism in general, namely, that the grounds of emotive descriptions of music are too ambiguous to warrant an objectivist interpretation (On the Musically Beautiful, Indianapolis: Hackett 1986, 14).
It's important to know and understand the difference between emotionalism and passion, especially when you're engaged in the frenzied pace of deadlines, performance reviews, and stiff competition.
Some find the emotionalism jejune, overblown and syrupy.
Despite the oversight of key issues like the operation of the Bluestocking Circle as a collective, male-female intimacy, emotionalism, and masculinity, this collection successfully expands the possibilities for understanding the Bluestockings.
To suppress the ideal, heterodox clerics (and their apologists in the academy and media) engage in one, and usually several, of the following: evasion, ad hominems, pseudo-apologies, emotionalism, tendentious sloganeering, misplaced concreteness, and armchair psychoanalysis.
The figures reveal an anguished emotionalism that finds a parallel in the work of Masaccio and Donatello.
Some detached analysis would not have gone awry in this earnest docu, which compromises its innately heartrending subject--the incalculable human costs of globalization and government bureaucracy gone haywire--by relying almost entirely on emotionalism and power-to-the-people platitudes for its impact.
The subtle shuttling between the growing anxieties of the traveler and the cycle of dream-parables creates a resonance, an anatomy of obsession and heightened emotionalism, that illuminates--as such texts have since Borges--the enchanting human energies that narrative cannot tidy into explanation.
The flowers, the weeping and wailing, the emotionalism that swept over certain types of people indicate deeper, more fundamental changes in British life which are investigated here.
It's a matter of great humanitarian concern, one whose power and emotionalism we understand and sympathize with,'' Ereli said, offering to ''take every opportunity and act in every way we can to help Japan realize its interests in this area.
Riding this wave of emotionalism, these attorneys succeed in securing large awards or exorbitant settlements.
In short, here Hatch brings a scholarly perspective to a subject matter that is often met with--even in some academic circles--an understandable but nevertheless distorting emotionalism.