emotional support


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support

 [sŭ-port´]
1. a structure that bears the weight of something else.
2. a mechanism or arrangement that helps keep something else functioning.
3. the foundation upon which a denture rests.
caregiver support in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the provision of the necessary information, advocacy, and support to facilitate primary patient care by someone other than a health care professional. See also caregiver.
decision-making support in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as providing information and support for a patient who is making a decision regarding health care.
emotional support
1. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the provision of reassurance, acceptance, and encouragement in times of stress.
2. a nursing intervention in the nursing minimum data set; actions designed to meet the affective, psychological, and social needs of the patient or client.
family support in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as promotion of family values, interests, and goals.
support hose an elastic garment for a limb that enhances venous circulation through creation of a pressure gradient by fabric pressure. See also compression therapy.
physician support in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as collaborating with physicians to provide quality patient care.
sibling support in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as assisting a sibling to cope with a brother's or sister's illness, chronic condition, or disability.
spiritual support in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as assisting the patient to feel balance and connection with a greater power.
sustenance support in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as helping a needy individual/family to locate food, clothing, or shelter.

emotional support1

the sensitive, understanding approach that helps patients accept and deal with their illnesses; communicate their anxieties and fears; derive comfort from a gentle, sympathetic, caring person; and increase their ability to care for themselves.
method Essential in providing emotional support are recognizing and respecting the individuality, personal preferences, and human needs of each patient. Understanding the sick and appreciating the psychological effects on the patient of the transition from health to illness are also important. The patient is encouraged to verbalize feelings and concerns, and the attentive listener avoids interjecting clichés, such as "Don't worry," "Take it easy," or "Everything will be all right." The nurse and other health team members realize that the patient may express some fears but may act out others through anger, hostility, silence, or assumed joviality. Efforts to change the patient, negative criticism, a judgmental attitude, and facial expressions that may indicate rejection are carefully avoided. Opportunities to listen to the troubled patient and provide compassionate and realistic counseling and care are sought.
interventions The nurse establishes means of communication, provides an atmosphere that invites the patient to discuss worrisome feelings, and presents a caring attitude. This is especially important when the illness damages the person's body image or self-concept.
outcome criteria Emotional support frequently improves the patient's psychological and physical state, often enabling him or her to accept the illness and to adjust with less anxiety to the changes required.

emotional support2

a nursing intervention from the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) defined as provision of reassurance, acceptance, and encouragement during times of stress. See also Nursing Interventions Classification.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hobart stressed the policy change, which was crafted over many months and comes in response to customer feedback, is not connected to United's refusal to allow New York performance artist Ventiko's emotional support peacock, Dexter, on a flight Jan.
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To help members navigate this issue, NAA developed the "NAA Toolkit, Emotional Support Animals: A Practical Guide to Reasonable Accommodation Requests" in 2016.
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But there are numerous websites where a person can pay to have a licensed psychotherapist for a telephone consultation in order to get a letter stating that their animal is needed for emotional support.
Based on the stress-buffering model, we expect a positive relationship between emotional support (including general emotional support, e.
And with results due over the next two weeks, the service is highlighting the emotional support it oers to those waiting to see how they have done in their GCSEs and A-Levels.
To verify a dog as an emotional support dog, documentation in the form of a letter from a health care provider or therapist is required.
Animals used for a Customer's emotional support are accepted in the cabin.
The results of the study showed that a teacher's consistency in providing emotional support was the determining factor in the classroom outcomes score.
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Work should be a place where people can get necessary emotional support," stated Dr.