emotional disorder


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to emotional disorder: depression, anxiety disorder, mental disorder, personality disorder

men·tal ill·ness

1. a broadly inclusive term, generally denoting one or all of the following: 1) a disease of the brain, with predominant behavioral symptoms, as in paresis or acute alcoholism; 2) a disease of the "mind" or personality, evidenced by abnormal behavior, as in hysteria or schizophrenia; also called mental or emotional disease, disturbance, or disorder, or behavior disorder;
See also: behavior disorder.
2. any psychiatric illness listed in Current Medical Information and Terminology of the American Medical Association or in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders of the American Psychiatric Association.
See also: behavior disorder.

emotional disorder

Emotional disability Psychiatry Behavior, emotional, and/or social impairment exhibited by a child or adolescent that consequently disrupts the child's or adolescent's academic and/or developmental progress, family, and/or interpersonal relationships

men·tal ill·ness

(men'tăl il'nĕs)
1. A broadly inclusive term, generally denoting either or both a disease of the brain, with predominant behavioral symptoms; a disease of the "mind" or personality, evidenced by abnormal behavior, as in hysteria or schizophrenia.
2. Any psychiatric illness listed in Current Medical Information and Terminology of the American Medical Association or in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders of the American Psychiatric Association.
See also: behavior disorder

be·hav·ior dis·or·der

(bē-hāv'yŏr dis-ōr'dĕr)
General term used to denote mental illness or psychological dysfunction, specificallythose mental, emotional, or behavioral subclasses for which organic correlates do not exist.
See also: antisocial personality disorder
References in periodicals archive ?
The current study reported that smoking is significantly influence emotional disorder among university students.
The three-year study found children who had three or more stressful events were three times more likely to develop emotional disorders than those who had not.
The research on emotional disorders in children clearly indicates a wide array of diagnoses, comorbid conditions, and weaknesses (Angold, Costello, & Erkanli, 1999).
8%) had a comorbid hyperkinetic disorder, 46 had a comorbid emotional disorder (12.
3,12) Indeed, services in the community for individuals with both developmental and emotional disorders are often described as fragmented, inaccessible, insular and inadequate.
Sexual behavior is a security concern if it involves a criminal offense, indicates a personality or emotional disorder, may subject the individual to undue influence or coercion, exploitation, or duress, or reflects lack of judgment or discretion.
To understand an emotional disorder like depression, it is helpful to understand emotions in general.
He begins by criticizing the thought that an agent can be judged to be experiencing an emotional disorder if his emotion causes him some type of harm.
Parents reported that they sought to obtain types of employment that would be compatible with the demands of caring for a child with a serious emotional disorder.
At one point, there was a misconception that asthma was an emotional disorder, which is so ridiculous now,'' says Berger, who also wrote ``Asthma for Dummies.
Therefore, plaintiff lawyers need to know how to evaluate whether a client's injuries include a disabling and compensable emotional disorder.
Complete assessment of an emotional disorder also includes a sexual history.