compensation

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compensation

 [kom″pen-sa´shun]
1. the counterbalancing of any defect of structure or function.
2. a mental process that may be either conscious or, more frequently, an unconscious defense mechanism by which a person attempts to make up for real or imagined physical or psychological deficiencies.
3. in cardiology, the maintenance of an adequate blood flow without distressing symptoms, accomplished by such cardiac and circulatory adjustments as tachycardia, cardiac hypertrophy, and increase of blood volume by sodium and water retention.

com·pen·sa·tion

(kom'pen-sā'shŭn),
1. A process in which a tendency for a change in a given direction is counteracted by another change so that the original change is not evident.
2. An unconscious mechanism by which one tries to make up for fancied or real deficiencies.
[L. com-penso, pp. -atus, to weigh together, counterbalance]

compensation

/com·pen·sa·tion/ (kom″pen-sa´shun)
1. the counterbalancing of any defect.
2. the conscious or unconscious process by which a person attempts to make up for real or imagined physical or psychological deficiencies.
3. in cardiology, the maintenance of an adequate blood flow without distressing symptoms, accomplished by cardiac and circulatory adjustments.

dosage compensation  in genetics, the mechanism by which the effect of the two X chromosomes of the normal female is rendered identical to that of the one X chromosome of the normal male.

compensation

(kŏm′pən-sā′shən)
n.
1. The act of compensating or the state of being compensated.
2. Biology The increase in size or activity of one part of an organism or organ that makes up for the loss or dysfunction of another.
3. Psychology Behavior that develops either consciously or unconsciously to offset a real or imagined deficiency, as in personality or physical ability.

com′pen·sa′tion·al adj.

compensation

[kom′pənsā′shən]
Etymology: L, compensare, to balance
1 the process of counterbalancing any defect in body structure or function.
2 the process of maintaining an adequate blood flow through such cardiac and circulatory mechanisms as tachycardia, fluid retention with increased venous return, and ventricular hypertrophy. Lack of compensation indicates a diseased heart muscle. See also compensated heart failure.
3 a complex defense mechanism that allows one to avoid the unpleasant or painful emotional stimuli that result from a feeling of inferiority or inadequacy. Examples include making an extraordinary effort to overcome a disability, scorning a quality that one lacks ("sour grapes"), and substituting hard work and excellent performance in one field for a lack of ability in another.
4 changes in structural relationships that accommodate foundation disturbances and maintain balance. See also overcompensation.

compensation

Orthopedics A change of structure, position or function of a part in an attempt by the body to adjust to or neutralize the abnormal force of a deviation of structure, position or function of another part Psychiatry
1. An unconscious defense mechanism in which one attempts to compensate for real or perceived defects.
2. A conscious process in which one strives to compensate for real or perceived defects of physique, performance skills, or psychological attributes; often the 2 types merge. See Individual psychology, Overcompensation.

com·pen·sa·tion

(kom'pĕn-sā'shŭn)
1. A process in which a tendency for a change in a given direction is counteracted by another change so that the original change is not evident.
2. An unconscious mechanism by which one tries to make up for imagined or real deficiencies.

compensation

alteration of direction of movement of adjacent body segments or joint function, normalizing function of other body segments or joints (that would otherwise function in an abnormal manner); i.e. an unconscious process by which change in one direction is counteracted by change in another direction, so that the original change is no longer obvious

com·pen·sa·tion

(kom'pĕn-sā'shŭn)
A process in which a tendency for a change in a given direction is counteracted by another change so that the original change is not evident.

compensation,

n the monetary reward for rendering a service; insurance providing financial return to employees in the event of an injury that occurs during the performance of their duties and that prohibits work. Compulsory in many states.
compensation, unemployment,
n insurance covering the employee so that compensation may be provided for loss of income as a result of unemployment.

compensation

the counterbalancing of any defect of structure or function.
1. in cardiology, the maintenance of an adequate blood flow without distressing signs.
2. in preventive medicine the payment of farmers for losses incurred by the destruction of their livestock when controlling an infectious disease.

depth-gain compensation
see time gain compensation.
References in periodicals archive ?
As noted above, an emolument includes compensation or other items of value.
Emolument says it receives salary and bonus data directly from individuals on an anonymous basis and has more than 20,000 contributions from individiuals at more than 3,500 institutions.
The setting up of an independent Emoluments Commission for recommending
Who benefits from the gaudy excesses of an interminable 'bidding process', beyond a cosy gaggle of football administrators and other sports industry hangers-on, who spend their time on first-class global junkets, eating and drinking their way through gigantic expense accounts, while receiving bungs and other emoluments on an industrial scale?
Benefits and emoluments will be calculated on the basis of your contract with the employer.
He observed that he was elected to parliament to protect the rights of people and not for the privileges and emoluments.
A closed door session will focus on the additional financial emoluments to Emiratis while doing their national military service.
Meanwhile the Rajya Sabha passed the Street Vendors Bill, Governors Emoluments Bill, National Institute of Technology and Rani Laxmi Bai Agricultural University Bill.
According to the Sections 19,20 of the Convention, officials of specialized agencies enjoy the same exemptions from taxation in respect of the salaries and emoluments paid to them by the specialized agencies and on the same conditions as are enjoyed by officials of the United Nations and will be exempt from national service obligations.
Les verifications de l'DL porteront notamment sur les pieces suivantes: le releve des emoluments (fiche de paie), le numero de la securite sociale, le document prouvant la retraite, le certificat de residence, l'attestation de revenu pour les non-salaries ainsi que sur le fichier du logement et de l'aide de l'Etat, precise-t-on.
The emoluments of the highest paid director were PS393,000, compared with PS329,000 the previous year.