emmetropization

em·me·trop·i·za·tion

(em'ĕ-trōp'i-zā'shŭn),
The process by which the refraction of the anterior ocular segment and the axial length of the eye tend to balance each other to produce emmetropia.

emmetropization

A process that is presumed to operate to produce a greater frequency of emmetropic eyes than would otherwise occur on the basis of chance. This mechanism would coordinate the development of the various components of the optical system of the eye (e.g. axial length, refracting power of the cornea, depth of the anterior chamber, etc.) to prevent ametropia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Medina's feedback model for emmetropization predicts that correction of myopes aggravates their condition and myopia will then progress linearly.
Emmetropization and optical development of the eye of the barn owl (Tyto alba).
Perhaps the most interesting point surrounded the process of emmetropization, which is often mistaken to continue until a child is about 5-6 years of age; in fact the process normally occurs in the first 18-24 months of life and this is important to remember since practitioners often erroneously decide against correcting refractive error for fear of affecting emmetropization, in a child of school-going age.
Scholz, 'Dark-rearing interference with emmetropization in the rhesus monkey', Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, vol.
Emmetropization is a process of matching the axial length of the eye to the focal length of its optics.
In the future, studies of artificial methods to control the emmetropization process may be the key to naturally fixing vision impairments.
As they grow, their eyes lengthen until all images fall perfectly on the retina, a process called emmetropization.
Understanding the mechanisms behind emmetropization and myopia could enable researchers someday to prevent or lessen myopic changes and blindness.