emetic


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Related to emetic: emetic drugs, tartar emetic

emetic

 [e-met´ik]
1. causing vomiting.
2. an agent that does this; examples are a strong solution of salt, mustard water, powdered ipecac, and ipecac syrup. Emetics should not be used when lye or other strong alkalis or acids have been swallowed, since vomiting may rupture the already weakened walls of the esophagus. Examples of such acids and alkalis are sodium hydroxide (caustic soda), potassium hydroxide (caustic potash), and carbolic acid. Emetics should also be avoided when kerosene, gasoline, nail polish remover, or lacquer thinner has been swallowed, since vomiting of these substances may draw them into the lungs.

e·met·ic

(ĕ-met'ik),
1. Relating to or causing vomiting.
2. An agent that causes vomiting, for example, ipecac syrup.
[G. emetikos, producing vomiting, fr. emeō, to vomit]

emetic

/emet·ic/ (ĕ-met´ik)
1. causing vomiting.
2. an agent that causes vomiting.

emetic

(ĭ-mĕt′ĭk)
adj.
Causing vomiting.
n.
An agent that causes vomiting.

e·met′i·cal·ly adv.

emetic

[imet′ik]
1 adj, pertaining to a substance that causes vomiting.
2 n, an emetic agent. Apomorphine hydrochloride, acting through the central nervous system, induces vomiting 10 to 15 minutes after parenteral administration. Syrup of ipecac is used in the emergency treatment of some drug overdosages and in certain cases of poisoning.

emetic

Herbal medicine
A herb used to induce vomiting; emetics include ipecac (Cephaelis ipecacuanha), lobelia (Lobelia inflata) and mustard seed (Brassica juncea).

emetic

Therapeutics Any agent that causes vomiting

e·met·ic

(ĕ-met'ik)
1. Relating to or causing vomiting.
2. An agent that causes vomiting.
[G. emetikos, producing vomiting, fr. emeō, to vomit]

emetic

Any substance that causes vomiting.

Emetic

A medication or substance given to induce vomiting.
Mentioned in: Poisoning

e·met·ic

(ĕ-met'ik)
1. Relating to or causing vomiting.
2. An agent that causes vomiting, e.g., ipecac syrup.
[G. emetikos, producing vomiting, fr. emeō, to vomit]

emetic (əmet´ik),

n a drug that induces vomiting.

emetic

1. causing vomiting.
2. an agent that causes vomiting. A strong solution of salt (1 tablespoon to 1 cup of water), mustard water (1 tablespoon to 1 cup of water), and powdered ipecac or ipecac syrup are examples of emetics. In dogs, commonly in need of such treatment, apomorphine may be used.

emetic factor
an agent, probably deoxynivalenol, produced by Fusarium graminearum and found in mold-affected grain. Causes vomiting and food rejection in pigs fed the grain. Called also vomitoxin.
References in periodicals archive ?
Two Clinical Syndromes Associated with Bacillus cereus Characteristic Emetic Sundroms Onset 0.
They have identified the genes responsible for production of emetic toxins, thus allowing the development of a PCR method to detect the emetic strains.
Contract award: agents for the treatment of peptic ulcers (a02b), accelerate intestinal motility agents (a03f), nausea and emetic agents (a04a), laxatives (a06a), agents that inhibit intestinal motility (a07d) and other minerals (a12cx).
CR was defined as the absence of emetic episodes or use of anti-emetic rescue medications during a specified period of time.
Bortezomib (Velcade, Millennium), dasatinib (Sprycel, Bristol Myers-Squibb), decitabine (Dacogen, MGI Pharma), lenalidomide (Revlimid, Celgene), nelarabine (Arranon, GlaxoSmithKline), sorafenib (Nexavar, Bayer Pharmaceuticals), sunitinib (Sutent, Pfizer), thalidomide (Thalomid, Celgene), and trastuzumab (Herceptin, Genentech) are all now considered to have minimal emetic risk.
Secondary endpoints included complete response for both the 0-48 and 0-72 hour time periods, complete control (defined as complete response and no more than mild nausea), number of emetic episodes, incidence and severity of nausea, and impact of PONV on patient functioning.
The fruit and leaves of wild cucurbits have been used in Indian and Chinese medicine for thousands of years, as emetics and purgatives and to treat liver disease.
She said some dogs could be saved if vets were allowed to import emetics that would induce a dog to throw up any poison consumed, but the government has not approved any emetics for importation.
10] He emphasized that Washington had been weakened not only by the bloodletting, but by other procedures as well (blistering, emetics, and laxatives) and that his heart had been severely taxed.
Other mainstays of Halsey's practice included giving emetics to induce vomiting, cathartics to trigger bowel movements and dispensing other popular medicines of the day, from snake root and caster oil to quinine, expectorants and various salts.