emergence

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e·mer·gence

(ē-mĕr'jens),
1. Recovery of normal function following a period of unconsciousness, especially that associated with a general anesthetic.
2.

emergence

[imur′jəns]
Etymology: L, emergere, to come forth
the point in the process of recovery from general anesthesia at which a return of spontaneous respiration, protective airway reflexes, and consciousness occurs. See also postanesthesia care.

e·mer·gence

(ē-mĕr'jĕns)
1. A stage in recovery from general anesthesia that includes a return to spontaneous breathing, voluntary swallowing, and normal consciousness.
2. In microbiology, the appearance and identification of new microorganisms or strains of previously identified species.
[L. emergo, arise, come forth]

e·mer·gence

(ē-mĕr'jĕns)
Stage in recovery from general anesthesia that includes return to spontaneous breathing, voluntary swallowing, and normal consciousness.
[L. emergo, arise, come forth]
References in periodicals archive ?
These findings could permit the selection of the most appropriate parasitoids according to the developmental stage of the host, as well as the selection of suitable prevention and control periods based on adult emergence patterns of parasitoids and the biological characteristics of the host.
Therefore, it might be appropriate to reduce these artificial control measures during adult emergence periods of parasitoids.
In Madeira, Ohio, the senior author identified trees that were planted after the 1987 emergence of Brood X but before the 1991 emergence of Brood XIV.
Troutman observed hundreds of periodical cicadas in May 2007 in Loveland and Batavia, Ohio, locations that last witnessed large numbers of cicadas during the 1991 emergence.
This correlation suggests that it should be possible to fine-tune the emergence forecast in May by using the extended weather forecast information.
The emergence of a system is a problem of how to differentiate between the whole and its parts at first, and then of finding out the characteristics of the whole which is more than the sum of its parts.
That is why the diversity and novelty of emergence at higher levels are more than those at lower levels.
The above-mentioned three characteristics of emergence belong to scientific ontological analysis in essence.
Diseases of humans and their domestic mammals: pathogen characteristics, host range and the risk of emergence.
The role of evolution in the emergence of infectious diseases.
To determine the first day of emergence and to re-examine the work of Heath (1968), who found that periodical cicadas emerge when the soil temperature reaches 17.
Letters and e-mails received from people living in emergence areas provided many data points, which were supplemented by calling county extension agents and state parks to verify that cicadas had been observed.