emergence

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e·mer·gence

(ē-mĕr'jens),
1. Recovery of normal function following a period of unconsciousness, especially that associated with a general anesthetic.
2.

emergence

[imur′jəns]
Etymology: L, emergere, to come forth
the point in the process of recovery from general anesthesia at which a return of spontaneous respiration, protective airway reflexes, and consciousness occurs. See also postanesthesia care.

e·mer·gence

(ē-mĕr'jĕns)
1. A stage in recovery from general anesthesia that includes a return to spontaneous breathing, voluntary swallowing, and normal consciousness.
2. In microbiology, the appearance and identification of new microorganisms or strains of previously identified species.
[L. emergo, arise, come forth]

e·mer·gence

(ē-mĕr'jĕns)
Stage in recovery from general anesthesia that includes return to spontaneous breathing, voluntary swallowing, and normal consciousness.
[L. emergo, arise, come forth]
References in periodicals archive ?
The internet sites received approximately 191 reports from counties in South Carolina, Georgia and North Carolina with comments on the emergence ranging from positive to neutral.
In Madeira, Ohio, the senior author identified trees that were planted after the 1987 emergence of Brood X but before the 1991 emergence of Brood XIV.
Troutman observed hundreds of periodical cicadas in May 2007 in Loveland and Batavia, Ohio, locations that last witnessed large numbers of cicadas during the 1991 emergence.
This correlation suggests that it should be possible to fine-tune the emergence forecast in May by using the extended weather forecast information.
Diseases of humans and their domestic mammals: pathogen characteristics, host range and the risk of emergence.
The role of evolution in the emergence of infectious diseases.
To determine the first day of emergence and to re-examine the work of Heath (1968), who found that periodical cicadas emerge when the soil temperature reaches 17.
Letters and e-mails received from people living in emergence areas provided many data points, which were supplemented by calling county extension agents and state parks to verify that cicadas had been observed.