emergence

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e·mer·gence

(ē-mĕr'jens),
1. Recovery of normal function following a period of unconsciousness, especially that associated with a general anesthetic.
2.

emergence

[imur′jəns]
Etymology: L, emergere, to come forth
the point in the process of recovery from general anesthesia at which a return of spontaneous respiration, protective airway reflexes, and consciousness occurs. See also postanesthesia care.

e·mer·gence

(ē-mĕr'jĕns)
1. A stage in recovery from general anesthesia that includes a return to spontaneous breathing, voluntary swallowing, and normal consciousness.
2. In microbiology, the appearance and identification of new microorganisms or strains of previously identified species.
[L. emergo, arise, come forth]

e·mer·gence

(ē-mĕr'jĕns)
Stage in recovery from general anesthesia that includes return to spontaneous breathing, voluntary swallowing, and normal consciousness.
[L. emergo, arise, come forth]
References in classic literature ?
On the ninth day after leaving the canoes, having done, as I reckon, about a hundred and twenty miles, we began to emerge from the trees, which had grown smaller until they were mere shrubs.
Out of all this rather mysterious conversation there did emerge at last a sort of admission that one particular motor car, of a given description, had stopped before the inn about an hour before, and that an elderly man had alighted, requiring some mechanical assistance.
As the young lady was not fully dressed, Mrs Brooks knew that she would not emerge again for some time.
Most of it was lost at the back of his throat, and what did emerge was mainly inaudible.
At the moment when he was passing through the courtyard of the cloister, beneath his brother's window, he heard that window open, raised his eyes and beheld the archdeacon's severe head emerge.
At eighteen, Miss Murray was to emerge from the quiet obscurity of the schoolroom into the full blaze of the fashionable world--as much of it, at least, as could be had out of London; for her papa could not be persuaded to leave his rural pleasures and pursuits, even for a few weeks' residence in town.