embryonic

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em·bry·on·ic

(em'brē-on'ik),
Of, pertaining to, or in the condition of an embryo.

embryonic

(ĕm′brē-ŏn′ĭk) also

embryonal

(ĕm′brē-ə-nəl)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or being an embryo.
2. also embryotic (-ŏt′ĭk) Rudimentary; incipient: an embryonic nation, not yet self-governing.

em′bry·on′ic·al·ly adv.

embryonic

See embryo.

embryonic

adjective
(1) Unborn, in utero.
(2) Undeveloped, developing, unformed, fledgling.

embryonic

adjective Undeveloped, related to an embryo

embryonic

Pertaining to, or to the state of being, an EMBRYO.

Embryonic

In the life cycle of the round worm, a very early life stage occurring within the uterus of the female round worm.

embryonic

emanating from or pertaining to embryo. See also embryo.

embryonic death
see early embryonic mortality (below).
embryonic disk
larger cells of the mammalian blastocyst which develop into the embryo.
early embryonic mortality
death of the embryo, i.e. before it becomes a fetus; a principal cause of temporary infertility in farm livestock. Amongst causes are errors in timing of insemination, chromosomal defects, asynchronous development of the endometrium.
embryonic period
see embryo.
embryonic regulation
ability of embryonic tissues to recognize changes in their size and location and to make the necessary adjustments to form the disk-shaped assembly of appropriate structures.
embryonic stem cell
stem cell of fetal origin.
embryonic vesicle
see chorionic vesicle.
References in periodicals archive ?
Post 2000 nationality politics are conditioned by reaction to a global order already in being, albeit embryonically.
Appropriately, the centre curves embryonically around a central square, its north-south spine traced by a public footpath through the site.
Dancers, curled embryonically on the floor, rise and aggregate into a cluster to embrace; the closeness becomes too constricting for some of them.
While we lack any precise image of imagination's development, even the most casual observation of human beings at various ages suggests that it would be absurd to claim that imagination is only embryonically present in young children and that it becomes increasingly more evident, elaborate and rich as we grow older.
This being said, there is a strong case to be made for the claim that substantial elements of the Irish Catholic masses - those Wolfe Tone dubbed "the men of no property" - had begun to think of themselves and their community in embryonically nationalist terms prior to the Famine and emigration.
It is unusual,' he adds, "because [muscle and skin] are embryonically distinct.