blastomere

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blastomere

 [blas´to-mēr]
one of the cells produced by cleavage of a fertilized ovum (zygote). Called also cleavage cell.

blas·to·mere

(blas'tō-mēr),
One of the cells into which the oocyte divides after its fertilization.
[blasto- + G. meros, part]

blastomere

/blas·to·mere/ (blas´to-mēr) one of the cells produced by cleavage of a zygote.

blastomere

(blăs′tə-mîr′)
n.
Any of the cells resulting from the cleavage of a fertilized ovum during early embryonic development.

blas′to·mer′ic (-mîr′ĭk, -mĕr′-) adj.

blastomere

[blas′təmēr]
Etymology: Gk, blastos + meros, part
any of the cells formed from the first mitotic division of a fertilized ovum (zygote). The blastomeres further divide and subdivide to form a multicellular morula in the first several days of pregnancy. Also called segmentation cell. See also blastula. blastomeric, adj.

blastomere

A cell produced by division (cleavage) in a fertilised egg.

blas·to·mere

(blas'tō-mēr)
One of the cells resulting from cleavage of a zygote or fertilized oocyte.
[blasto- + G. meros, part]

blastomere

any cell that occurs in the BLASTULA.

blastomere

one of the cells produced by cleavage of a fertilized ovum.
References in periodicals archive ?
Embryonic cells are the furthest from development, but even if Geron's particular approach doesn't work, some experts predict that treatments could be available using these cells as early as a decade from now.
Ascidian larval muscle cells therefore provide an experimental system with which to explore an intrinsic genetic program for autonomous specification of embryonic cells.
Every embryonic cell will have exactly one potential enhancer-reporter.
After scientists first grew human embryonic stem cells in the laboratory in 1998, many researchers waxed about an imminent era of cellular-replacement therapy, where the blank slate embryonic cells would be transformed into an array of tissues useful for treating Parkinson's disease, heart failure, diabetes, and other conditions.
The new version also allows the donor of the embryonic cells to be identified, since the immunological make-up of the cells may be important if they are transplanted into patients.
This is the first commercially available test to leverage bioinformatics to inform in vitro fertilization (IVF) transfer decisions by identifying potential abnormalities across all 24 chromosomes (aneuploidy) from a single embryonic cell.
Implantation of neural embryonic cells into the brains of patients with Parkinson's disease improved their ability to move, according to the results of a study published in the June issue of the Archives of Neurology.
The report from scientists at the University of Illinois at Chicago identifies two enzymes that alter the expression of certain genes needed for embryonic cells to differentiate and become endothelial cells.
Coaxing specialized adult cells to regress back into a more malleable, embryonic-stem-cell-like state (a process called "induced pluripotency") would also allow scientists to realize the therapeutic benefits of embryonic cells without the thorny ethical problems that plague cells derived from embryos.
When the researchers put the embryonic cells into mice and reactivated the gene, the cells formed healthy intestines.
But we already know embryonic cells cannot generate placental tissue.
Japanese scientists reported they have successfully coaxed monkey embryonic cells into forming dopamine-producing cells, a brain chemical involved in movement that is depleted in Parkinson's disease.