embryology

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Related to embryological: Embryological development

embryology

 [em″bre-ol´o-je]
the science of the development of the individual during the embryonic stage and, by extension, in several or even all preceding and subsequent stages of the life cycle. adj., adj embryolog´ic.

em·bry·ol·o·gy

(em'brē-ol'ŏ-jē),
Science of the origin and development of the organism from fertilization of the oocyte to the end of the eighth week. Usually used to include all stages of prenatal life.
[embryo- + G. logos, study]

embryology

/em·bry·ol·o·gy/ (em″bre-ol´ah-je) the science of the origin and development of the individual from fertilization of an oocyte to the end of the eighth week of development and, by extension, during any stage of prenatal development.

embryology

(ĕm′brē-ŏl′ə-jē)
n.
1. The branch of biology that deals with the formation, early growth, and development of living organisms.
2. The embryonic structure or development of a particular organism.

em′bry·o·log′ic (-ə-lŏj′ĭk), em′bry·o·log′i·cal adj.
em′bry·o·log′i·cal·ly adv.
em′bry·ol′o·gist n.

embryology

[em′brē·ol′əjē]
Etymology: Gk, en, bryein + logos, science
the study of the origin, growth, development, and function of an organism from fertilization to birth. Kinds of embryology include comparative embryology, descriptive embryology, and experimental embryology. embryologic, embryological, adj.

em·bry·ol·o·gy

(em'brē-ol'ŏ-jē)
Science of the origin and development of the organism from fertilization of the oocyte to the end of the eighth week and, by extension, all subsequent stages up to birth.
[embryo- + G. logos, study]

embryology

The branch of science concerned with the process of physical development of the body, from the time of fertilization of the egg (ovum) to the time of birth.

embryology

the study of the developing EMBRYO in animals or plants.

em·bry·ol·o·gy

(em'brē-ol'ŏ-jē)
Science of the origin and development of the organism from fertilization of the oocyte to the end of the eighth week.
[embryo- + G. logos, study]

embryology

(em´brēol´əjē),
n the study of the origin, growth, development, and function of an organism from fertilization to birth.

embryology

the science of the development of the individual animal during the embryonic stage and, by extension, in several or even all preceding and subsequent stages of the life cycle.
References in periodicals archive ?
Comparison of embryological details in the two groups Embryological Controls Cases p-value data (n=58) (n=42) Mean number 11.
This dispassionate approach is most concerning with regard to embryological stem cell research where the embryo is frequently perceived as simply so much biologic matter.
Some (those who believe in an embryological explanation) think the cyst derives from joint capsule mesenchymal tissue that inadvertently gets entrapped in the arterial wall during embryonic development.
Additional information is needed from floral development, embryological, and especially biochemical data to confirm these findings so that a comprehensive morphological cladistic analysis can be completed.
No one had done classical embryological assays in the zebra fish.
This was a metaphysical principle that Spencer thought was repeatedly verified in phenomena as varied as embryological growth and the transition from primitive to civilized humans.
In his experimental work, Loeb transformed lower animals by embryological engineering.
Furthermore embryological studies have now demonstrated that the adipocytes in different regions of the body have different embryonic origins (Christian Dani, Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Nice, France).
Prostatic utricle cysts are embryological remnants of the Mullerian duct, with prevalence rates as high as 4% and 1% in newborns and adults, respectively.
The genetic contributors to NTDs are still poorly understood, but include genes involved in the folic acid pathway, in both fetal and maternal metabolism, and genes coding for many aspects of embryological control such as planar cell polarity and ciliogenesis.
This is a broad term used to describe a range of conditions that arise owing to errors in the early development of the nervous system, either during closure of the neural tube (also called primary neurulation, from conception to day 28) or subsequent embryological development (or secondary neurulation).
Developmental abnormalities of the great vessels of the thorax and their embryological basis.