embrasure


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embrasure

 [em-bra´zher]
a space continuous with an interproximal space, produced by curvatures of teeth in contact in the same arch; it provides a passage through which food escapes from the occlusal surfaces during mastication.

em·bra·sure

(em-brā'shūr),
In dentistry, an opening that widens outwardly or inwardly; specifically, that space adjacent to the interproximal contact area that spreads toward the facial, gingival, lingual, occlusal, or incisal aspect.
[Fr. an opening in a wall for cannon]

embrasure

/em·bra·sure/ (em-bra´zher) the interproximal space occlusal to the area of contact of adjacent teeth in the same dental arch.

embrasure

[embrā′zhər]
a normally occurring space between adjacent teeth on the same arch (maxillary or mandibular) resulting from variations in the positions and contours of teeth. Embrasures provide a spillway for the escape of food during mastication. See also spillway.

em·bra·sure

(em-brā'shŭr)
dentistry An opening that widens outwardly or inwardly; specifically, that space adjacent to the interproximal contact area that spreads toward the facial, gingival, lingual, occlusal, or incisal aspect.
[Fr. an opening in a wall for cannon]

em·bra·sure

(em-brā'shŭr)
In dentistry, an opening that widens outwardly or inwardly; specifically, that space adjacent to the interproximal contact area that spreads toward facial, gingival, lingual, occlusal, or incisal aspect.
[Fr. an opening in a wall for cannon]

embrasure

(embrā´zhər),
n the small triangle-like spaces between the curved proximal surfaces of the teeth. Embrasure spaces provide an escape route for food to pass during chewing.
embrasure, buccal,
n an embrasure that opens toward the cheeks.
embrasure clasp,
embrasure hook,
n an extension of a removable partial denture into the embrasure above the contact area between two adjacent teeth, which resists movement in a cervical direction.
embrasure, interdental,
n the spaces formed by the interproximal contours of adjoining teeth, beginning at the contact area and extending lingually, facially, occlusally, and apically.
embrasure, labial,
n an embrasure that opens toward the lips.
embrasure, lingual,
n an embrasure that opens toward the tongue.
embrasure, occlusal,
n an embrasure that opens toward the occlusal surface or plane.
References in periodicals archive ?
It displays various construction details, but the best part of the exhibition here is certainly the wonderful views of the town that open from the embrasures.
Venus and Cupid by Lucas Cranach the Elder (left) and (right) Maria Lactans: The Virgin and Child Crowned by Angels in a Window Embrasure by Martin Schongauer
Hearing him above, Alberto and Susana shrink further into the embrasure so that he won't see them and embrace even more closely.
Taking a deep breath, he went back to the embrasure.
Shafts of light are deployed not only to bring out the lustre of the gilt-tooled spines of volumes of L'Histoire naturelle piled up at Eastnor Castle and to represent the reflection of the polished marble floors of the Codrington Library at All Souls, Oxford, and the Library at Trinity College, Cambridge, but also--more interestingly--to create fractured, almost abstract compositions: for example, an open book on a windowledge in the library of the Society of Antiquaries, London, looking out towards the courtyard of Burlington House, or a book placed on a William Kent chair in a window embrasure at Houghton.
The man took it into the window embrasure to read it, leaving Nick standing.
Barbara Guest writes in Forces of Imagination that "The structure of a poem should create an embrasure inside of which language is seated in watchful docility, like the unicorn.
4), the crowned figures set inside a window embrasure, and the last work by the artist remaining in private hands, also far exceeded expectations, selling to Browse and Darby on behalf of the Peter Moores Foundation at Compton Verney for just over a 1m [pounds sterling], another auction record.
Strong, The Economic Philosophy of Lochner: Emergence, Embrasure and Emasculation, 15 Ariz.
If an anterior tooth temporary or bridge features a rough anterior surface, the assistant spatulates the entire face of each rough tooth with the temporary material, smooths the material with a wet gloved finger, and then uses the edge of the spatula to scrape temporary material away from the embrasure and inter-proximal spaces between the teeth.
Although the passage is nominally an evident cursus dis-honorum, in the disclosive embrasure of the door, as in a tableau vivant or in a cinematic frame, we perceive on the husband's face a familiar quizzical smile.
Spreadeagled, he sought with his foot for the top of the embrasure.