embarrass

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embarrass

 [em-bar´as]
to impede the function of; to obstruct.

embarrass

/em·bar·rass/ (em-bar´as) to impede the function of; to obstruct.

embarrass

(ĕm-băr′ăs)
To interfere with or compromise function.

embarrass

to impede the function of; to obstruct.
References in periodicals archive ?
The higher levels and beings are often ironically lowered; for example, the numinous Una comes embarrassingly close to being raped, and her rescuers are comical (I.
Embarrassingly, she bumped into her ex, but managed to put on a brave face.
Roto, Rick Joy and Scogin Elam Bray, whose CDs you don't seem to be able to buy at the moment--hopefully soon because their web sites are either non-existent or are embarrassingly barren.
They're by Bertie and cost an embarrassingly small pounds 80 (call 020 7380 3800 for stockists).
And in the final minute player-manager Keith Curle embarrassingly also saw a red card for a professional foul.
Aiding and abetting the new assault are Harvard University Press and New York University Press, which have embarrassingly and irresponsibly published two new books that well illustrate George Orwell's remark about the "selective manipulation of history.
By the late 19605, however, the message movie's buttoned-down pieties, not to mention its confidence in various authority figures to solve social problems, seemed embarrassingly dated.
Against an almost embarrassingly outplayed Southampton side, Robert Pires put the Gunners ahead early on and Thierry Henry's deflected strike eventually made it 2-0 with 16 minutes left.
Until embarrassingly recently, I had never heard "dot.
More embarrassingly, astronomers had lost track of most of the baryons--ordinary, visible matter made of protons, electrons, and neutrons.
If Ferguson's political verve and historical knowledge serve her well in these two chapters, it leaves her vulnerable and almost embarrassingly inept in the chapters on works of fiction, where there are problems ranging from simple errors of fact to gross distortions of emphasis, making Annie John, for example, into a philippic on colonial power rather than a series of stories on the growth and incipient independence of a young girl.
The problem is that many embarrassingly bad examples are still being produced by people who sometimes do not know what they are doing.