embarrass


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embarrass

 [em-bar´as]
to impede the function of; to obstruct.

embarrass

/em·bar·rass/ (em-bar´as) to impede the function of; to obstruct.

embarrass

(ĕm-băr′ăs)
To interfere with or compromise function.

embarrass

to impede the function of; to obstruct.
References in periodicals archive ?
But as site operator Peter Anthony Mosier asks, "How can accurate quotes from the Watch Tower's publication possibly embarrass the Watch Tower?
com said: "Parents will always embarrass their children through absolutely no fault of their own.
Three out of four youngsters believe their folks enjoy making them blush in front of others, while one in three were sure their parents deliberately embarrass them just to get a reaction.
THEY seem the coolest couple in the world, but Barack Obama and his wife Michelle still embarrass their kids.
START EARLY: You can't embarrass a four-year-old; they haven't learnt to be embarrassed so you can talk about the physical sides of intimacy.
She'll share her man rather than lose him, and embarrass the pants off everybody in the process (herself included.
The only disincentive built into the law is negligible: The Registrar-Recorder's Office will print up an occasional report listing violators' names, and this might embarrass them.
If you have something to say to me, don't embarrass me in front of everyone,'' Perez said at the time.
com, which quizzed 1,500 children, said: "Parents will always embarrass their children through absolutely no fault of their own.
And as the row took the gloss off their progress to the World Twenty20 semifinals, Younis insisted any cheats would be caught on camera and warned: "Don't embarrass Pakistan.
Booth said that people ask her how she dare to embarrass Mr Blair.
The guy who co-wrote ``Pulp Fiction'' directs, using filmmaking tricks that would embarrass Tarantino.