elope

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elope

[ilōp′]
Etymology: ME, gantlopp, to run away
Usage notes: (informal)
to leave a locked or secured psychiatric institution without notice or permission.

elope

1. To run away secretly with a lover, esp. to marry.
2. To leave a hospital, esp. a psychiatric hospital, without permission.
References in periodicals archive ?
TOP-SECRET WEDDING OF OUR DREAMS MARGARET O'Neill and Warren Calderone, who live in Vancouver, chose to have two weddings - beginning with a top-secret elopement to Scotland.
You can tell if your elopement risk assessment program is missing the mark and could be working harder for your facility by asking yourself the following five questions.
GREAT STORY Wilson Hepple''s painting of the elopement of Bessie Surtees and John Scott from Newcastle Quayside in 1772 HISTORY Craftsman John Apps has been commissioned by English Heritage to fashion a table, benches and armchair in the style of the 17th Century
Above, Wilson Hepple's painting of the elopement of Bessie Surtees and John Scott from the house, in Newcastle, in 1772
Among children with autism aged 7-10 years, the rate of elopement was almost 30%, which was eight times higher than for the child's siblings without an ASD.
The ongoing survey, published April 20 and created by the Interactive Autism Network and other autism awareness and research groups, defines elopement as "the tendency to try to leave safe spaces or a responsible person's care at age 4 years or older, beyond the toddler years when it is considered normal for a child to bolt from caregivers on a beach or in a store, or to leave the front yard and enter the street.
A new post-admission protocol for evaluating patient history, closely monitoring patient behavior, and staff assessment of patients most "at risk" for elopement.
Between the time of elopement and the time a youth returns or is apprehended, their safety is in jeopardy.
But some now prefer a less formal kind of marriage, which is essentially elopement, because they do not have the economic means to face a prospective father-in-law.
The seven-year-old hasn't been seen out since December, when he ran over hurdles at Musselburgh, and his last run on the Flat was when beaten a neck by Elopement at Hamilton three months before that, after he had missed the break.
In both, the story of Helen's elopement with Paris and of the war it engendered is a story of passion.
Shelley's atheism and republicanism combined with his elopement and move to Italy make him very attractive to today's intelligentsia, a man whose search for 'truth' knocks down established signposts, cheats tradesmen, preaches equality and dines off silver.