ellipse

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ellipse

(i-lips′) [L. ellipsis, fr Gr. elleipsis, a falling short]
In geometry, an oval or egg-shaped figure. In surgery, incisions of such shape are commonly made to remove lesions from the skin.
elliptic (-lip′tik), adjectiveelliptical (′ti-kăl) elliptically (′ti-k(ă-)lē)
References in periodicals archive ?
Varga, 1993, Elliptically Contoured Models in Statistics (Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Publishers).
This risk measure is equivalent to the VaR under the assumption that losses are elliptically distributed.
One such piece is the Elliptically Polarizing Undulator (EPU), which gives scientists the freedom to change the light polarization between linear, elliptical and circular, and to widen the radiation peaks in terms of emission energy -- all of which allows users to more fully "see" the different characteristics of materials.
In stanza 58, for instance, Hill refers elliptically to William Cowper's poem "The Castaway," to Cowper's having kept hares as pets, and to Charlotte Bronte's fascination with the poem -- all in a mere three lines packed with verbal electricity
In the opening scene of Seobe Prva knjiga, Crnjanski's camera eye similarly focuses on the human subject elliptically, by first honing in on the belly of Vuk Isakovich.
Characteristic of many poems in The Branch Will Not Break, "Autumn Begins" moves elliptically, almost reticently, as if the white spaces of silence paradoxically enlarge and embolden what is spoken in the poem.
Molinari also often cites in the notes the various passages from Aristotle's Poetics, or interpretations of them (especially Castelvetro's) to which Tasso refers quite elliptically.
It is difficult to write about partly, also; because it is such an intensely and elliptically cinematic work that its various components-plot, setting,.
Somewhat elliptically but passionately in his still-halting but intense English, he explains his fascination with the Belgian artist's surrealism.
Like the best French thrillers, Bernard Rapp's suspense film builds its tension elliptically, emphasizing the questions behind its odd characters' motivations before springing its surprises.
More narrowly conceived, the Biblical and Classical tales of the tribes have been elliptically retold in Brakhage's films, off and on, since the 1950s: Oedipus (The Way to Shadow Garden [1954]), The Descent to the Underworld (The Dead [1960], Dante's Styx [1975]) The Sinai theophany (Blue Moses [1962]), Apocalypse (Oh Life, a Woe Story, The A Test News [1963]), Genesis (Creation [1979]), The Fall (The Machine of Eden [1970], The Animals of Eden and After [1970]), The Vision of Isaiah (The Peaceable Kingdom [1971]), The Afterlife and Orpheus (The Dante Quartet [1987]), and Plato's Allegory of the Cave (Visions in Meditation #3) [1987]).
She then moved slowly into colour with a series of delicate grey paintings of identical discs folding elliptically into space.