behavior

(redirected from elimination behavior)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

behavior

 [be-hāv´yer]
the observable responses, actions, or activities of someone. adj., adj behav´ioral.
adaptive behavior behavior that fosters effective or successful individual interaction with the environment.
contingent behavior actions that are dependent upon a specific stimulus.
behavior disorder a general concept referring to any type of behavioral abnormality that is functional in origin.
disorganized infant behavior a nursing diagnosis defined as alteration in integration and modulation of the physiological and behavioral systems of functioning (autonomic, motor, state-organizational, self-regulatory, and attentional-interactional systems) in an infant.
health seeking b's see health seeking behaviors.
behavior modification
1. an approach to correction of undesirable conduct that focuses on changing observable actions. Modification of the behavior is accomplished through systematic manipulation of the environmental and behavioral variables related to the specific behavior to be changed. The principles and techniques of this method have been used in treatment of both physical and mental disorders, such as alcoholism, smoking, obesity, and stress. See also conditioning.
2. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as promotion of a behavior change.
behavior modification (omaha) on the second level of the intervention scheme of the omaha system, a target definition defined as activities designed to promote a change of habits.
behavior modification: social skills in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as assisting the patient to develop or improve interpersonal social skills.
readiness for enhanced organized infant behavior a nursing diagnosis defined as a pattern of modulation of the physiologic and behavioral systems of functioning (autonomic, motor, state-organizational, self-regulatory, and attentional-interactional systems) in an infant, which is satisfactory but can be improved, resulting in higher levels of integration in response to environmental stimuli.
risk for disorganized infant behavior a nursing diagnosis defined as the risk for alteration in integration and modulation of the physiological and behavioral systems of functioning in an infant; see also disorganized infant behavior.
behavior therapy a therapeutic approach in which the focus is on the patient's observable behavior, rather than on conflicts and unconscious processes presumed to underlie his maladaptive behavior. This is accomplished through systematic manipulation of the environmental and behavioral variables related to the specific behavior to be modified; operant conditioning, systematic desensitization, token economy, aversive control, flooding, and implosion are examples of techniques that may be used in behavior therapy. Studies of classical and operant conditioning form the basis of behavior therapy, which has been used in treatment of both physical and mental disorders, such as alcoholism, smoking, obesity, and stress. See also behavior modification.

be·hav·ior

(bē-hāv'yōr),
1. Any response emitted by or elicited from an organism.
2. Any mental or motor act or activity.
3. Specifically, parts of a total response pattern.
[M.E., fr. O. Fr. avoir, to have]

behavior

/be·hav·ior/ (be-hāv´yer) deportment or conduct; any or all of a person's total activity, especially that which is externally observable.behav´ioral

behavior

(bĭ-hāv′yər)
n.
1. The actions or reactions of a person or animal in response to external or internal stimuli.
2. The manner in which something functions or operates.

be·hav′ior·al adj.

behavior

[bihā′vyər]
Etymology: ME, behaven
1 the manner in which a person acts or performs.
2 any or all of the activities of a person, including physical actions, which are observed directly, and mental activity, which is inferred and interpreted. Kinds of behavior include abnormal behavior, automatic behavior, invariable behavior, and variable behavior.

behavior

Conduct, bearing, demeanor, manner Psychology Manner of behaving—good or bad; mode of conduct; comportment. See Affective behavior, Catatonic behavior, Compensatory behavior, Dyssocial behavior, Eusocial behavior, High-risk behavior, Homosexual behavior, Novelty-seeking behavior, Preening behavior, Purging behavior, Sexual behavior, Suicidal behavior, Symbolic behavior, Withdrawing behavior.

be·hav·ior

(bē-hāv'yŏr)
1. Any response emitted by or elicited from an organism.
2. Any mental or motor act or activity.
3. Parts of a total response pattern.
Synonym(s): behaviour.
[M.E., fr. O. Fr. avoir, to have]

be·hav·ior

(bē-hāv'yŏr)
1. Any response emit-ted by or elicited from an organism.
2. Any mental or motor act or activity.
3. Specifically, parts of a total response pattern.
Synonym(s): behaviour.
[M.E., fr. O. Fr. avoir, to have]

behavior,

n the manner in which a person acts or performs; any or all of the activities of a person, including physical action learned and unlearned, deliberate or habitual.
behavior management,
n the techniques used to control or modify an action or performance of a subject. In dentistry, usually associated with the management of oral hygiene behavior, dietary behavior, or patient behavior under stress.
behavior modification,
n alterations, changes, or transfers from a socially unacceptable and destructive act to a socially acceptable, nondestructive one. In dentistry, usually associated with oral habits such as finger or thumb sucking, oral cavity breathing, nail biting, and smoking.
behavior therapy,
n psychotherapy that attempts to modify observable, maladjusted patterns of behavior by the substitution of a new response or set of responses to a given stimulus.

behavior

the activity or pattern of activity of the patient; can be modified by training and medication; used clinically as a measure of cerebral activity.

abnormal behavior
includes any activity judged to be outside the normal behavior pattern for animals of that particular class and age, including the vices, the fixed patterns of abnormality.
aggressive behavior
is common in animals as part of the establishment of territorial rights by males, as competition for sexual favors, because of fear of the unknown, and as maternal protection of young. In companion animals, aggression and dominance directed against humans can also be learned. See also aggression.
allelomimetic behavior
group activity behavior; those behavioral traits used to interact with others, particularly developed during the early socialization period.
auditory behavior
the use of the voice to communicate is poorly developed in animals but is used for example in the various voices used by cattle including mooing, lowing, bellowing. Is used most extensively by animals in communicating between mother and young and in courtship.
automatistic behavior
see stereotypic behavior (below).
communicative behavior
the behavioral patterns that result in communication between animals. Includes auditory, visual and chemical patterns.
consumptive behavior
includes inappropriate sucking and wool sucking, particularly in cats. May be the result of early weaning.
destructive behavior
involves digging or the destruction of items, such as furniture, doors, or toys, by chewing. Causes include separation anxiety, fear-induced aggression and play aggression.
elimination behavior
the ritual and method of passing urine and feces, particularly as seen in dogs and cats. This includes searching for the site, pre-elimination behavior of sniffing, scratching, etc., posture and post-elimination action such as scratching the ground or covering feces with dirt. Housetraining involves modification of this behavior.
epimeletic behavior
maternal behavior; that demonstrated by a dam caring for her young in the early stages.
et-epimeletic behavior
care-seeking behavior; young responding to the dam's care giving. In puppies, this includes tail-wagging, licking the dam's face, and following the dam closely.
hallucinatory behavior
behavior which suggests dementia. This may be inherent or acquired, e.g. shying at nonexistent objects in cows with nervous acetonemia, biting at imaginary flies by dogs.
ingestive behavior
includes overeating, inadequate intake of food, predation, wool sucking, pica, coprophagia, garbage eating and food-related aggression.
behavior modification
the use of learning techniques to alter behavior.
predatory behavior
chasing and killing is commonly displayed by cats in catching birds and rodents. Dogs, particularly in packs, may show predatory behavior in threatening and killing of livestock and, in some instances, humans.
sexual behavior
includes courtship and the mating act. Much of the behavior is visual including posture, feather fluffing, tail carriage; some of it is auditory, especially in cats, but chemical communication via pheromones is the clincher.
social behavior
behavior relative to others in the group. Includes establishment of the peck order, bulling by steers in feedlots, crowd pressure in the feeding of large groups of pigs, cannibalism in overcrowded communities, even self-immolation in lemming communities. The social stress that may follow abnormal group behavior may result in lowered production, reduction in disease resistance, or the expression of actual disease, e.g. esophagogastric ulcer of pigs.
stereotypic behavior
constant and repetitive actions, such as vocalization, grooming, walking or weaving, which would otherwise be seen normally in the species. See also obsessive-compulsive behavior.
thermoregulatory behavior
actions such as seeking cool places, lapping water, huddling are self-explanatory examples.
visual behavior
body language for animals. Posture, gait, other body movements all convey information about the animal.

Patient discussion about behavior

Q. Is there any explanation for this behavior? My son is 7 years old. He has a very uncooperative behavior with all his friends, his teachers and with us as well. He opposes for everything been taught to him by his teachers. He never cooperates with his friends and he always argues with everyone. He is very hostile to us and is always ready to fight. We have discussed about him to a doctor and he said it may be the signs of ADHD. Still he needs to be diagnosed officially which they may start after meeting my son. I was wondering about the reasons which can lead to such a behavior of my child? Is there any explanation for this behavior?

A. ADHA IS GENETIC IN SOME CASES-IT IS GOOD THAT YOU TOOK HIM TO A DR,YOUR SON WILL BE ALRIGHT,ONCE THE DR FINDS OUT WHAT MEDS WORK FOR HIM.GOOD LUCK--MRFOOT56

Q. rude/nasty behavior My sister was diagnosed with Bipolar and continues to take medication. She never went to Psychotherapy. Her demeanor is always very negative and her behavior is often critical and rude. My mother's attributes this to her ‘condition’ therefore reinforces her negative behavior. I haven't read anything about Bipolar that states rude/nasty behavior is a symptom. Is this type of behavior attributable to Bipolar?

A. damaez, I totally agree with you. Our bodies are so mal-nourished from the proper neccessities due to the way our foods are prepared that the body doesn't function properly. I believe that so many people are diagnosed with all types of disorders and put on medication and still act the same way with very little improvement. now a days they have a pill for everything. I have never heard of so many disorders in my life time as you hear about now. Bipolar is so easily thrown around that people use this excuse for being rude, disrespectful, and down right mean.You can be in a bad mood go see a doctor and be diagnosed as Bipolar. I work in the field of Human Services in a residential treatment program for DSS Adolescents and just about all that reside are Bipolar it is unreal. Sad but true.The more that is diagnosed the more pills,treatment and MONEY!

Q. What can I do to check on his behavior and make him regular… my 7 year son is seen with ADHD. I am not able to control on his high urges and irregularity and confusion which comes with this ADHD. What can I do to check on his behavior and make him regular…I know if I start now probably he will be better in coming years….

A. Very well………..you need to make some strategies for your child. Like create a daily routine for your child. Place your child`s belongings at the same place daily and at same time. If your child is doing anything, please keep the thing away which may distract him. Limit the choices from many things to 2 things only if possible. Describe anything in clear and short way. Make goals for your child like for positive behavior and appreciate him when he does. Please scold less or don’t shout on him for his mistakes at all rather make him understand by reducing on his demands or choices. Help your child to find his talents and make him work on them.

More discussions about behavior