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electron

 [e-lek´tron]
any of the negatively charged particles arranged in orbitals around the nucleus of an atom and determining all of the atom's physical and chemical properties except mass and radioactivity. Electrons flowing in a conductor constitute an electric current; when ejected from a radioactive substance, they are beta particles.ƒ

The number of electrons revolving around the nucleus of an atom is equal to its atomic number. An atom of oxygen, for instance, which has an atomic number of 8, has eight electrons in orbit around the nucleus in a manner similar to the planets revolving around the sun in our solar system.

Electrons greatly influence the behavior of an atom toward other atoms. The combination of various elements to form compounds is brought about by the losing or gaining of electrons; the process is sometimes called “sharing” of electrons. For example, the combination of the elements sodium and chlorine produce the compound sodium chloride (table salt). This is accomplished by the transfer of one electron from the outer electron shell of the sodium atom to the outer electron shell of the chlorine atom. This combining of elements by the loss or gain of electrons is called electrovalence.

e·lec·tron (β-),

(ē-lek'tron),
One of the negatively charged subatomic particles that orbit the positive nucleus, in one of several energy levels called shells; in mass they are estimated to be 1/1836.15 of a proton; when emitted from inside the nucleus of a radioactive substance, electrons are called β particles. A nucleus and its electrons constitute an atom.
See also: shell.
[electro- + -on]

electron

/elec·tron/ (e-lek´tron) an elementary particle with the unit quantum of (negative) charge, constituting the negatively charged particles arranged in orbits around the nucleus of an atom and determining all of the atom's physical and chemical properties except mass and radioactivity.electron´ic

electron

[ilek′tron]
Etymology: Gk, elektron, amber
1 a negatively charged elementary particle that has a specific charge, mass, and spin. The number of electrons associated with the nucleus of an atom is equal to the atomic number of the substance.
2 a negative beta particle emitted from a radioactive substance. See also atom, element, ion, neutron, proton.

e·lec·tron

(β-) (ĕ-lek'tron)
One of the negatively charged subatomic particles that are distributed about the positive nucleus and with it constitute the atom; in mass they are estimated to be 1/1836.15 of a proton; when emitted from inside the nucleus of a radioactive substance, electrons are called beta particles.
[electro- + -on]

Electron

One of the small particles that make up an atom. An electron has the same mass and amount of charge as a positron, but the electron has a negative charge.

electron (i·lekˑ·trn),

n the negatively charged particle that orbits around the nucleus of an atom.

e·lec·tron

(ĕ-lek'tron)
Negatively charged subatomic particles that orbit the positive nucleus, in one of several energy levels called shells. A nucleus and its electrons constitute an atom.
[electro- + -on]

electron (e) (ēlek´tron),

n a negatively charged elementary particle constituent in every neutral atom, with a mass of 0.000549. (Particles with an equal but opposite charge are called
positrons.)
electron beam,
n See electron stream.
electron stream,
n (electron beam, cathode ray, cathode stream), a stream of electrons emitted from the negative electrode (cathode) in a roentgen-ray tube; their bombardment of the anode gives rise to the roentgen rays.

electron

any of the negatively charged particles arranged in orbits around the nucleus of an atom and determining all of the atom's physical and chemical properties except mass and radioactivity. Electrons flowing in a conductor constitute an electric current; when ejected from a radioactive substance, they constitute the beta particles.

electron acceptor
see oxidant.
electron beam
the stream of electrons that flows from the anode to the cathode in the x-ray tube and then interacts with the tungsten target to produce x-rays.
electron carrier
a molecule associated with membrane-bound proteins that accepts and transfers electrons.
electron donor
electron micrographs
photographic images of electron microscopic fields.
electron microscope
see electron microscope.
electron microscopy
technology of using an electron microscope.
References in periodicals archive ?
2-5 show electron micrographs of the genitalia of the Hungarian specimens.
Eric Erbe's electron micrographs also enabled Hirsh to see which membranes within the cells were, most affected by temperature fluctuations.
These values are based on electron micrographs of the samples.
The use of drawings, schematic representations of life cycles, figures showing important morphological characters and photographs some of which are in color and scanning electron micrographs is extensive throughout the book.
According to a report in New Scientist, after collecting X-rays and scanning electron micrographs of the bones, D'Anastasio now contends that brucellosis better explains the lesions.
We thank Daniel Fedorko for help with microbiological analysis and Govinda Visvesvara for help with interpretation of the microsporidia electron micrographs.
Scanning electron micrographs of ruthenium tetroxide-stained blend specimens were next used to obtain detailed particle-size estimates and particle-size distributions.
There are many b&w graphs and electron micrographs and a color plate section in the middle of the book.
Electron micrographs showed a variety of shapes and sizes of wood particles recovered from all gut sections (Figures 1-5).
After administration of neurotoxin, mice persisted to exhibit a 56% decrease in grip strength; and radial nerve electron micrographs showed axonal demyelination, inactive mitochondria and uneven dispersion of neurofilaments and microtubules.
Ghadially continued: "And some 6 years and 40,000 electron micrographs later, his book entitled Ultrastructural Pathology of the Cell was published in 1975.

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