luminescence

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Related to electroluminescence: phosphorescence, Photoluminescence

luminescence

 [lu″mĭ-nes´ens]
the property of giving off light without a corresponding degree of heat.

lu·mi·nes·cence

(lū'mi-nes'ents),
Emission of light from a body as a result of a chemical reaction. See: bioluminescence.
[L. lumen, light]

luminescence

/lu·mi·nes·cence/ (loo″mĭ-nes´ens) the property of giving off light without a corresponding degree of heat.

luminescence

(lo͞o′mə-nĕs′əns)
n.
1. The emission of light that does not derive energy from the temperature of the emitting body, as in phosphorescence, fluorescence, and bioluminescence. Luminescence is caused by chemical, biochemical, or crystallographic changes, the motions of subatomic particles, or radiation-induced excitation of an atomic system.
2. The light so emitted.

luminescence

[lo̅o̅′mines′əns]
Etymology: L, lumen, light, escens, beginning
1 the emission of light by a material after excitation by some stimulus.
2 the emission of light by intensifying-screen phosphors after x-ray interaction. See also thermoluminescent dosimetry.

lu·mi·nes·cence

(lū'mi-nes'ĕns)
Emission of light from a body as a result of a chemical reaction.
[L. lumen, light]

luminescence

the production of light by living organisms that is brought about by the oxidation of the protein luciferin. The reaction requires ATP and is catalysed by LUCIFERASE. See also BIOLUMINESCENCE.

luminescence

Emission of light by certain substances resulting from the absorption of energy (e.g. from electrical fields, chemical reaction, or other light), which is not due to a rise in temperature (unlike incandescence). The emitted radiation is characteristic of the particular substance. When the light emitted is due to exposure to a source of light the process is usually called photoluminescence. When the light emitted is due to either a high-frequency discharge through a gas, or to an electric field through certain solids such as phosphor which is used in fluorescent lamps, television picture tubes, etc., it is called electroluminescence. See bioluminescence; fluorescence; incandescence; fluorescent lamp; phosphorescence.

lu·mi·nes·cence

(lū'mi-nes'ěns)
Emission of light from a body as a result of a chemical reaction.
[L. lumen, light]

luminescence,

n 1. the emission of light by a material after excitation by some stimulus.
2. the emission of light by intensifying screen phosphors after radiographic interaction.

luminescence

the property of giving off light without a corresponding degree of heat.
References in periodicals archive ?
Saito, Organic Electroluminescence Devices with Bright Blue Emission, in Optoelectronic-Devices and Technology, Vol 7, Mita Press, Tokyo, 83 (1992).
Above than 1% doping of MNPs, electroluminescence dramatically decreases beside the change in peak shape is observed.
Radiative recombination of electron-hole pairs causes electroluminescence of the device (Figure 1).
5 litre engine and features organic electroluminescence information display.
Solid-state lighting technology based on injection electroluminescence devices, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), already found numerous applications in traffic lights, automotive signage, full-colour video displays, liquid-crystal display backlighting, optical measurements, phototherapy, and other niche applications [1,2].
It also presented the contribution Konica Minolta can make to the environment by using organic electroluminescence in future lighting systems, which was previously announced in March 2007.
The Display FDP Expo will feature LCDs, plasma displays, organic electroluminescence displays (OELDs), inorganic electroluminescence displays, field emission displays (FEDs), surface-conduction Electron-emitter displays (SEDs), electronic papers, touch panels and many other exhibitions.
Electroluminescence was originally invented as soft light for car interiors.
We chose to rule out the older lighting technology -- incandescent bulbs -- in favor of newer designs like electroluminescence and LEDs, both surface mount and fiber optic.
With the redesign, we're bringing characters to electroluminescence, which is very exciting.
In a fluorescent polymer, electroluminescence results when the injected electrons and holes recombine radiatively, he said.
That ability to tune the color of the electroluminescence by varying the nanocrystals' size is something that can't be done with polymers.