luminescence

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Related to electroluminescence: phosphorescence, Photoluminescence

luminescence

 [lu″mĭ-nes´ens]
the property of giving off light without a corresponding degree of heat.

lu·mi·nes·cence

(lū'mi-nes'ents),
Emission of light from a body as a result of a chemical reaction. See: bioluminescence.
[L. lumen, light]

luminescence

/lu·mi·nes·cence/ (loo″mĭ-nes´ens) the property of giving off light without a corresponding degree of heat.

luminescence

(lo͞o′mə-nĕs′əns)
n.
1. The emission of light that does not derive energy from the temperature of the emitting body, as in phosphorescence, fluorescence, and bioluminescence. Luminescence is caused by chemical, biochemical, or crystallographic changes, the motions of subatomic particles, or radiation-induced excitation of an atomic system.
2. The light so emitted.

luminescence

[lo̅o̅′mines′əns]
Etymology: L, lumen, light, escens, beginning
1 the emission of light by a material after excitation by some stimulus.
2 the emission of light by intensifying-screen phosphors after x-ray interaction. See also thermoluminescent dosimetry.

lu·mi·nes·cence

(lū'mi-nes'ĕns)
Emission of light from a body as a result of a chemical reaction.
[L. lumen, light]

luminescence

the production of light by living organisms that is brought about by the oxidation of the protein luciferin. The reaction requires ATP and is catalysed by LUCIFERASE. See also BIOLUMINESCENCE.

luminescence

Emission of light by certain substances resulting from the absorption of energy (e.g. from electrical fields, chemical reaction, or other light), which is not due to a rise in temperature (unlike incandescence). The emitted radiation is characteristic of the particular substance. When the light emitted is due to exposure to a source of light the process is usually called photoluminescence. When the light emitted is due to either a high-frequency discharge through a gas, or to an electric field through certain solids such as phosphor which is used in fluorescent lamps, television picture tubes, etc., it is called electroluminescence. See bioluminescence; fluorescence; incandescence; fluorescent lamp; phosphorescence.

lu·mi·nes·cence

(lū'mi-nes'ěns)
Emission of light from a body as a result of a chemical reaction.
[L. lumen, light]

luminescence,

n 1. the emission of light by a material after excitation by some stimulus.
2. the emission of light by intensifying screen phosphors after radiographic interaction.

luminescence

the property of giving off light without a corresponding degree of heat.
References in periodicals archive ?
There are reports that the one-year old partnership between Sony Corporation and Panasonic Corporation for the development of organic electroluminescence display panels in a joint manner will be wrapped up by the last part of this year.
Effect of multi-walled carbon nanotubes on electron injection and charge generation in AC field-induced polymer electroluminescence.
is unveiling a prototype of a 56-inch organic electroluminescence TV with 4K technology, which it has developed jointly with Taiwanese company AU Optronics Corp.
Instead, Panasonic will focus on developing organic electroluminescence panels and other display equipment considered to be more promising as screen technology for the future, the sources said.
5-inch organic electroluminescence display, larger than most other smartphones, and is capable of connecting to high-speed data communication using the LTE network service, the company said.
has developed a technology to make images more vivid on organic electroluminescence display panels for smartphones and other electronics products, company sources said Friday.
The firms want to speed up the development of large-screen organic electroluminescence (OEL) televisions, which consume less power and offer a sharper picture than conventional flat panels, the Nikkei daily said.
It uses solid-state electroluminescence as opposed to the thermal radiation of traditional bulbs.
Measuring electroluminescence (EL) using NIR imaging cameras permits the detection of fractures as well as failures in the crystal structure.
They cover rare earth complexes with carboxylic acids, polyaminopolycarboxylic acids, and amino acids; nitrogen-based rare earth complexes; rare earth polyoxometalate complexes; the coordination chemistry of rare earth alkoxides, aryloxides, and hydroxides; rare earth metals trapped inside fullerenes: endohedral metallofullerenes; the organometallic chemistry of the lanthanide metals; lanthanide-based magnetic molecular materials; gadolinium complexes as magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents for diagnosis; electroluminescence based on lanthanide complexes; near-infrared luminescence from lanthanide (III) complexes; and luminescent rare earth complexes as chemosensors and bioimaging probes.
The IS02 has an organic electroluminescence display with the advantage of low power consumption.