subclinical seizure

(redirected from electrographic seizure)

sub·clin·i·cal sei·zure

a seizure detected by EEG, which has no clinical correlate, that is, an EEG seizure alone.

sub·clin·i·cal sei·zure

(sŭb-klini-kăl sēzhŭr)
A seizure detected by electroencephalogram, which has no clinical correlate.
References in periodicals archive ?
The inclusion criteria were as follows: (1) the patients with refractory seizures of neonatal onset were treated with at least two antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) to control the seizure;[4] (2) severely abnormal background and at least one electrographic seizure detected by multichannel video-EEG (vEEG); (3) the patients were followed till at least 1 year old and survived with developmental delay.
The clinical and electrographic seizure burden in babies with HIE can be considerable and is often not reduced by current antiepileptic drugs.
Overall, 43% of neonates in the EEG seizure treatment group had an electrographic seizure, compared with 59% of neonates in the clinical seizure treatment group.
Furthermore, seven had clinical and/or electrographic seizure resolution within 7 days, and nine had such resolution within 1 month.
It holds capacity to suppress spontaneous convulsive behaviour and electrographic seizures in zebrafish disease models for Dravet Syndrome.
This association suggest that at least 24 hours-monitoring of these patients could be useful for the diagnosis of clinical and/or electrographic seizures.
Electrographic seizures occurring in the absence of clinical seizures in neurologically abnormal newborns are reported to be common.
Continuous video EEG monitoring showed right centro-frontal electrographic seizures.
A published report on 12 nodding syndrome patients studied with magnetic resonance imaging of the brain found normal results or non-specific changes, and electroencephalography performed on 10 patients between nodding episodes showed abnormal background in six patients and electrographic seizures in two patients (2).
At doses lower than 300 nmol, PS infusion produced discrete electrographic seizures (ED50 = 68 nmol) associated with mild behavioral seizures.
This approach could significantly underestimate the number of epileptic events and incidence of PTE by omitting the electrographic seizures.