electroencephalogram

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Related to electroencephalograms: encephalography

electroencephalogram

 (EEG) [e-lek″tro-en-sef´ah-lo-gram″]
the record produced by electroencephalography; a tracing of the electric impulses of the brain.
Sample of electroencephalogram tracings showing normal activity, seizure activity, and brain death.

e·lec·tro·en·ceph·a·lo·gram (EEG),

(ē-lek'trō-en-sef'ă-lō-gram),
The record obtained by means of the electroencephalograph.

electroencephalogram

/elec·tro·en·ceph·a·lo·gram/ (EEG) (-en-sef´ah-lo-gram″) a recording of the potentials on the skull generated by currents emanating spontaneously from nerve cells in the brain, with fluctuations in potential seen as waves.
Enlarge picture
Electroencephalogram. Recordings made while the subject was excited, relaxed, and in various stages of sleep. During excitement the brain waves are rapid and of small amplitude, whereas in sleep they are much slower and of greater amplitude.

electroencephalogram

(ĭ-lĕk′trō-ĕn-sĕf′ə-lə-grăm′)
n.
1. A graphic record of the electrical activity of the brain as recorded by an electroencephalograph.
2. The procedure performed to produce such a record.

electroencephalogram (EEG)

[ilek′trō·ensef′ələgram′]
Etymology: Gk, elektron + enkephalos, brain, gramma, record
a graphic chart on which is traced the electric potential produced by the brain cells, as detected by electrodes placed on the scalp. The resulting brain waves are called alpha, beta, delta, and theta rhythms, according to the frequencies they produce, which range from 2 to 12 cycles per second with an amplitude of up to 100 μV. Variations in brain wave activity are correlated with neurological conditions, psychological states, and level of consciousness. See also encephalography.
enlarge picture
Electroencephalogram: normal awake adult

electroencephalogram

Neurology A graphic recording of minute electric currents produced by neuronal activity scalp electrodes, which is used to diagnose neurologic disorders and in neurophysiologic research

e·lec·tro·en·ceph·a·lo·gram

(EEG) (ĕ-lek'trō-en-sef'ă-lō-gram)
The record obtained by means of the electroencephalograph.

electroencephalogram

The multichannel tracing on paper of the output of the ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPH, representing the electrical activity of the brain as occurring between pairs of electrodes in contact with the scalp and representing the algebraic sum of an immense amount of underlying electrical activity.

electroencephalogram

see EEG.

Electroencephalogram (EEG)

A record of the tiny electrical impulses produced by the brain's activity. By measuring characteristic wave patterns, the EEG can help diagnose certain conditions of the brain.

e·lec·tro·en·ceph·a·lo·gram

(EEG) (ĕ-lek'trō-en-sef'ă-lō-gram)
Record obtained by an electroencephalograph.

electroencephalogram

the record produced by electroencephalography; a tracing of the electric impulses of the brain. Called also EEG.
References in periodicals archive ?
Physicians had assumed that only people with unusual electroencephalograms (EEGs) in response to flashing lights are candidates for VGRS, notes Edward J.
The AD8222 dual-channel in-amp has the highest CMRR in its class, an advantage for designers building multi-channel devices with a low tolerance for noise, like electrocardiograms (ECGs), electroencephalograms (EEGs) and precision industrial control systems.
Electroencephalograms (EEGs) show network brain-wave patterns typical of either being asleep or awake.
Recorded with electroencephalograms, the patterns were reproducible in at least eight other mammal species known to be experiencing pain.
Electrodes placed over the back of the skull near the brain's vision center (occipital region) pick up brain waves and feed them into electronic circuitry that arranges them as electroencephalograms (EEGs).
The trial assessed the effects of PRX-03140 on quantitative electroencephalograms (EEGs), a measure of the electrical activity in the brain that has been used to characterize the effects of drugs that act on the central nervous system.
The researchers also recorded electroencephalograms (EEG) from the individuals who were allowed to sleep.
For more than a decade, different states of hippocampus activity have been crudely detected from outside the skull by electroencephalograms (EEGs).