elastic


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elastic

 [e-las´tik]
capable of resuming normal shape after distortion.

e·las·tic

(ē-las'tik),
1. Having the property of returning to the original shape after being stretched, compressed, bent, or otherwise distorted.
2. A rubber or plastic band used in orthodontics as either a primary or adjunctive source of force to move teeth. The term is generally modified by an adjective to describe the direction of the force or the location of the terminal connecting points.
[G. elastreō, epic form of elaunō, drive, push]

elastic

/elas·tic/ (e-las´tik) able to resist and recover from stretching, compression, or distortion applied by a force.

e·las·tic

(ĕ-las'tik)
1. Having the property of returning to the original shape after being compressed, bent, or otherwise distorted.
2. A rubber or plastic band used in orthodontics as either a primary or adjunctive source of force to move teeth. The term is generally modified by an adjective to describe the direction of the force or the location of the terminal connecting points.
[G. elastreō, epic form of elaunō, drive, push]

elastic

; elasticity property of returning to original shape and size (i.e. recoil) following distortion by applied force (e.g. compression or tension)

e·las·tic

(ĕ-las'tik)
1. Rubber or plastic band used in orthodontics as either a primary or adjunctive source of force to move teeth.
2. Having the property of returning to original shape after being stretched, compressed, bent, or otherwise distorted.
[G. elastreō, epic form of elaunō, drive, push]

elastic,

adj referring to property of a solid substance that permits recovery of its shape after a deformation resulting from force application.
elastic deformation,
elastic impression,
elastic, intermaxillary,
n See elastic, maxillomandibular.
elastic, intramaxillary,
n an elastic band used within either the maxillary or mandibular arch.
elastic limit,
elastic, maxillomandibular,
n an elastic band used between the maxillary and mandibular dentitions.
elastic memory,
n 1. the property of a material such as wax that enables it, after being warmed, bent, and cooled, to return to its original form upon rewarming.
n 2. a rubber plastic band used to apply force to the teeth.

elastic

capable of resuming normal shape after distortion.

elastic bands
used in orthodontics as a means of moving teeth.
elastic modulus
the constant or scale factor which defines quantitatively the relationship between the deformation of the vascular wall (or other elastic medium) and the deforming force.
elastic ring castration
elastic tissue
connective tissue made up of yellow elastic fibers, frequently massed into sheets.
References in periodicals archive ?
Stitch the elastic to the skirt 1/4" from the elastic lower edge, stretching the elastic between the pins to match the skirt circumference.
2 Observation equation for identification of elastic wave velocity and Q-Value distributions
The finding of a tumor with fibrous stroma and hemosiderin deposition beyond the elastic lamina might indicate that the tumor has perforated and healed by fibrosis.
The convergence of four trends, Li says, "has opened up this elastic strain engineering field": the development of nanostructured materials, such as carbon nanotubes and Mo[S.
The participants undertook 5 sets of 10 repetition maximum (RM) with ELASTIC and ASYM CAM exercises.
The mathematical model of a real gantry robot, according to Denavit-Hartenberg algorithm, in witch was added supplementary terms (terms that are expressing the elastic displacements, specific for a real robot), can be written as follows: (Nicolescu A.
The 64 with grade I injuries received either an elastic wrap (Ace), an Air-Stirrup ankle brace, or the wrap combined with the brace.
Another area of potential for OBCs is elastic films, where Affinity metallocene ULDPE elastomers already fill a niche in applications that require up to 100% stretch.
A PACKAGE CONTAINING EIGHT TO 20 ELASTICS IS PRICED AT $4.
Key words: calibration methods; contact mechanics; depth-sensing indentation; elastic modulus; instrumented indentation; measurement science; nanoindentation; tip shape characterization.
Using millimeter-scale polymer beads for vertebrae and thin elastic threads for muscles and ligaments, the researchers have created spinelike structures that can deform drastically, even become damaged, yet still return to their original forms.
Finish by cutting the elastic off a decorative headband, leaving only the ornamental part.