elastic


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Related to elastic: elastic modulus, elastic collision, elastic energy

elastic

 [e-las´tik]
capable of resuming normal shape after distortion.

e·las·tic

(ē-las'tik),
1. Having the property of returning to the original shape after being stretched, compressed, bent, or otherwise distorted.
2. A rubber or plastic band used in orthodontics as either a primary or adjunctive source of force to move teeth. The term is generally modified by an adjective to describe the direction of the force or the location of the terminal connecting points.
[G. elastreō, epic form of elaunō, drive, push]

elastic

/elas·tic/ (e-las´tik) able to resist and recover from stretching, compression, or distortion applied by a force.

e·las·tic

(ĕ-las'tik)
1. Having the property of returning to the original shape after being compressed, bent, or otherwise distorted.
2. A rubber or plastic band used in orthodontics as either a primary or adjunctive source of force to move teeth. The term is generally modified by an adjective to describe the direction of the force or the location of the terminal connecting points.
[G. elastreō, epic form of elaunō, drive, push]

elastic

; elasticity property of returning to original shape and size (i.e. recoil) following distortion by applied force (e.g. compression or tension)

e·las·tic

(ĕ-las'tik)
1. Rubber or plastic band used in orthodontics as either a primary or adjunctive source of force to move teeth.
2. Having the property of returning to original shape after being stretched, compressed, bent, or otherwise distorted.
[G. elastreō, epic form of elaunō, drive, push]

elastic,

adj referring to property of a solid substance that permits recovery of its shape after a deformation resulting from force application.
elastic deformation,
elastic impression,
elastic, intermaxillary,
n See elastic, maxillomandibular.
elastic, intramaxillary,
n an elastic band used within either the maxillary or mandibular arch.
elastic limit,
elastic, maxillomandibular,
n an elastic band used between the maxillary and mandibular dentitions.
elastic memory,
n 1. the property of a material such as wax that enables it, after being warmed, bent, and cooled, to return to its original form upon rewarming.
n 2. a rubber plastic band used to apply force to the teeth.

elastic

capable of resuming normal shape after distortion.

elastic bands
used in orthodontics as a means of moving teeth.
elastic modulus
the constant or scale factor which defines quantitatively the relationship between the deformation of the vascular wall (or other elastic medium) and the deforming force.
elastic ring castration
elastic tissue
connective tissue made up of yellow elastic fibers, frequently massed into sheets.
References in periodicals archive ?
Please view the Duet animation on Nordson s YouTube channel to fully understand the benefits this unique design can deliver to elastic attachment applications.
In this paper the authors propose several analysis applications made for determining the elastic displacements of particular Gantry robot prismatic joints.
SNAP TO IT: The red elastic bands break easily, according to posties
Their analyses were in turn based upon relationships developed by Sneddon [38] for the penetration of a flat elastic half space by different probes with particular axisymmetric shapes (e.
Although they're not yet sure how to do it, the researchers aim to scale down their system using micro- or even nanoscale parts to replace the beads, solder, and elastic thread, says Boncheva.
WHAT YOU NEED: Goodle Ouchless snag-free elastics, $2 for 75.
David Lord, the verger of All Saints Church in West Bromwich, said an 18-inch length of elastic would satisfy his needs, allowing him to recondition the 100-year-old motorised timepiece.
For each bow, buy 2 feet of ribbon (we used 2-1/2-inc-wide checkered) and 4-1/2 inches of 3/4-inch-wide elastic.
The Vancouver-based Elastic Path delivers e-commerce software to facilitate business establishments in the monetization of their products, services and digital content throughout customer touchpoints, comprising websites, mobile apps, smart devices, as well as APIs.
In summary, P-E polymers are tough polyolefins, which are uniquely soft and elastic.
NIST researchers are developing methods for detecting and quantifying, with high spatial resolution (sub 100 nm diameter), the elastic strains associated with selective wet oxidation of A1GaAs confined between GaAs layers.