elapse


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elapse

(i-laps′) [L. elapsus, slipped by]
Of time, to pass.
References in classic literature ?
2,000 years to elapse between our image of Caesar and our image of Foch.
Emmy was calculating eagerly the time that would elapse before the letter would arrive and be answered.
A few days were allowed to elapse (as a precaution agreed to by both parties) before the jewel was actually taken out of the bank.
A full twenty seconds must elapse from the moment I press the ball till the explosion takes place.
Have the pale-faces eaten their own buffaloes, and taken the skins from all their own beavers," continued the savage, allowing the usual moment of decorum to elapse, after the words of greeting, before he again spoke, "that they come to count how many are left among the Pawnees?
Ten years elapse since Katie and George first were attracted to each other, and the obstacles to their romance are reminiscent of Dickens.
As a result, 2000 years won't elapse until January 1, 2001.
Further, to properly document the establishment of a FLP and the transfers of interests, same time should elapse between the contribution to the partnership and the girl of the limited interests--at least until the contribution is recorded on the partnership's books and the contributing partner's capital account has been properly credited.
In the meantime, immunization coverage must be kept at high levels, surveillance must be maintained, and three years without any polio elapse before the Americas can be certified as polio-free.
Too few cases are investigated, more than a year might elapse before high-priority cases are assigned to investigators, and some fraud investigations have been called off because files were missing, the grand jury said.