ejection murmur


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Related to ejection murmur: pansystolic murmur, holosystolic murmur

murmur

 [mer´mer]
an auscultatory sound, benign or pathologic, loud or soft, particularly a periodic sound of short duration of cardiac or vascular origin.
aortic murmur a sound indicative of disease of the aortic valve.
apex murmur (apical murmur) a heart murmur heard over the apex of the heart.
arterial murmur one in an artery, sometimes aneurysmal and sometimes constricted.
Austin Flint murmur a loud presystolic murmur at the apex heard when aortic regurgitation is preventing the mitral valve from closing; called also Flint's murmur.
blood murmur one due to an abnormal, commonly anemic, condition of the blood. Called also hemic murmur.
cardiac murmur heart murmur.
cardiopulmonary murmur one produced by the impact of the heart against the lung.
continuous murmur a humming heart murmur heard throughout systole and diastole.
crescendo murmur one marked by progressively increasing loudness that suddenly ceases.
Cruveilhier-Baumgarten murmur one heard at the abdominal wall over veins connecting the portal and caval systems.
diastolic murmur a heart murmur heard at diastole, due to mitral obstruction or to aortic or pulmonic regurgitation with forward flow across the atrioventricular valve; it has a rumbling quality.
Duroziez's murmur a double murmur during systole and diastole, palpated over the femoral or another large peripheral artery; due to aortic insufficiency.
ejection murmur a systolic murmur heard predominantly in midsystole, when ejection volume and velocity of blood flow are at their maximum; it is produced by ejection of blood into the pulmonary artery and aorta.
Flint's murmur Austin Flint murmur.
friction murmur friction rub.
functional murmur a heart murmur occurring in the absence of structural changes in the heart, usually due to high cardiac output states. Called also innocent murmur and physiologic murmur.
Gibson murmur a long rumbling sound occupying most of systole and diastole, usually localized in the second left interspace near the sternum, and usually indicative of patent ductus arteriosus. Called also machinery murmur.
Graham Steell murmur a high-pitched diastolic murmur due to pulmonic regurgitation in patients with pulmonary hypertension and mitral stenosis.
heart murmur see heart murmur.
hemic murmur blood murmur.
innocent murmur functional murmur.
machinery murmur Gibson murmur.
mitral murmur a heart murmur due to disease of the mitral valve; it can be either obstructive or regurgitant.
musical murmur one that has a periodic harmonic pattern; it may be either a heart murmur or a vascular murmur.
organic murmur one due to a lesion in the organ or organ system being examined, e.g., in the heart, in a blood vessel, or in lung tissue.
pansystolic murmur a regurgitant murmur heard throughout systole, due to blood flow between two chambers normally of very different pressures in systole; the most common causes are mitral regurgitation, tricuspid regurgitation, and ventricular septal defects.
physiologic murmur functional murmur.
prediastolic murmur one occurring just before and with diastole, due to aortic regurgitation or pulmonic regurgitation.
presystolic murmur one shortly before the onset of ventricular ejection, usually associated with a narrowed atrioventricular valve.
pulmonic murmur one due to disease of the pulmonary valve or artery.
regurgitant murmur a heart murmur due to a dilated valvular orifice with consequent valvular regurgitation.
seagull murmur a raucous murmur resembling the call of a seagull, frequently heard in aortic stenosis or mitral regurgitation.
Still's murmur a functional heart murmur of childhood, with a buzzing or vibratory tone heard in midsystole; it usually disappears by puberty.
systolic murmur a heart murmur heard at systole, usually due to mitral or tricuspid regurgitation or to aortic or pulmonary obstruction.
to-and-fro murmur a friction sound or murmur heard with both systole and diastole.
tricuspid murmur a heart murmur caused by disease of the tricuspid valve; it may be either obstructive or regurgitant.
vascular murmur one heard over a blood vessel.
vesicular murmur vesicular breath sounds.

e·jec·tion mur·mur

a diamond-shaped systolic murmur produced by the ejection of blood into the aorta or pulmonary artery and ending by the time of the second heart sound component produced, respectively, by closing of the aortic or pulmonic valve.

ejection murmur

ejection murmur

Cardiology A diamond-shaped systolic murmur ending before the 2nd heart sound, produced by ejection of blood of aortic and pulmonary valve stenosis

e·jec·tion mur·mur

(ē-jek'shŭn mŭr'mŭr)
A diamond-shaped systolic murmur produced by the ejection of blood into the aorta or pulmonary artery and ending by the time of the second heart sound component produced, respectively, by closing of the aortic or pulmonic valve.

murmur

an auscultatory sound, particularly a periodic sound of short duration of cardiac or vascular origin.

anemic murmur
see blood murmur (below).
aortic murmur
a sound indicative of disease of the aortic valve.
apex murmur
one heard over the apex of the heart.
arterial murmur
one in an artery, sometimes aneurysmal and sometimes constricted.
blood murmur
one due to an abnormal, commonly anemic, condition of the blood. Called also anemic murmur.
cardiac murmur
see heart murmur (below).
cardiopulmonary murmur
one produced by the impact of the heart against the lung.
continuous murmur
a humming murmur heard throughout systole and diastole.
crescendo murmur
one marked by progressively increasing loudness.
crescendo-decrescendo murmur
one with increasing intensity until mid- to late systole, then a decreasing intensity, giving a diamond-shaped tracing on phonocardiography. Characteristic of pulmonary stenosis.
decrescendo murmur
one with an intensity that gradually decreases. Heard during diastole in aortic or pulmonary valvular insufficiency.
diamond-shaped murmur
refers to the phonocardiographic tracing of a crescendo-decrescendo murmur.
diastolic murmur
one at diastole, due to mitral obstruction or to aortic or pulmonary regurgitation.
ejection murmur
systolic murmur heard predominantly in mid-systole, when ejection volume and velocity of blood flow are at their maximum.
friction murmur
friction rub.
functional murmur
a cardiac murmur occurring in the absence of structural changes in the heart.
heart murmur
any adventitious sound heard over the region of the heart. It may indicate a leaking or stenotic valve, a congenital patency between the right and left sides of the heart, or be a functional murmur which does not indicate cardiac disease. These occur in young foals, some of them disappear before maturity.
hemic murmur
see blood murmur (above).
innocent murmur
one caused by increased velocity of blood rather than a cardiac lesion.
machinery murmur, machinery-like murmur
a long, rumbling sound occupying most of systole and diastole. Characteristic of patent ductus arteriosus and arteriovenous fistulas.
mitral murmur
one due to disease of the mitral valve.
musical murmur
a cardiac murmur having a periodic harmonic pattern.
organic murmur
one due to structural change in the heart.
pansystolic murmur
one heard throughout systole.
prediastolic murmur
one occurring just before and with diastole, due to mitral obstruction or to aortic or pulmonary regurgitation.
presystolic murmur
one occurring shortly before the onset of ventricular ejection, usually associated with a narrowed atrioventricular valve.
pulmonary murmur
one due to disease of the valves of the pulmonary artery.
radiating heart murmur
one which is heard over a wider area or over another area. The systolic murmur of subaortic stenosis radiates up the aortic arch and carotid arteries. It can be heard over the right, as well as left, heart base and occasionally over the head.
regurgitant murmur
one due to a dilated valvular orifice, with consequent regurgitation of blood through the valve.
seagull murmur
a raucous murmur resembling the call of a seagull, frequently heard in aortic insufficiency.
systolic murmur
one occurring at systole, usually due to mitral or tricuspid regurgitation, or to aortic or pulmonary obstruction.
tricuspid murmur
one caused by disease of the tricuspid valve.
vascular murmur
one heard over a blood vessel.
vesicular murmur
the normal breath sounds heard over the lungs.
References in periodicals archive ?
At the time of presentation to our hospital, her physical examination was positive for elevated jugular vein pressure and distention, a systolic ejection murmur, bilateral crackles and wheezing, 3+ pitting edema up to the knees bilaterally, and multiple skin ulcerations.
7) These emboli may manifest symptomatically as dyspnea and syncopal episodes, and may even present on auscultation as ejection murmur or a 0diastolic "tumor plop.
Physical examination was remarkable for a 2/6 systolic ejection murmur heard throughout the precordium.