eidetic


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Related to eidetic: Eidetic imagery

eidetic

 [i-det´ik]
denoting exact visualization of events or objects previously seen; a person having such an ability.

ei·det·ic

(ī-det'ik),
1. Relating to the power of visualization of and memory for objects previously seen that reaches its height in children aged 8-10.
2. A person possessing this power to a high degree.
[G. eidon, saw (aorist of verb)]

eidetic

/ei·det·ic/ (i-det´ik) denoting exact visualization of events or objects previously seen; a person having such an ability.

eidetic

[īdet′ik]
Etymology: Gk, eidos, a form or shape seen
1 adj, pertaining to or characterized by the ability to visualize and reproduce accurately the image of objects or events previously seen or imagined.
2 n, a person possessing such ability.

eidetic

adjective Referring to vividly precise and accurate recollection of objects, events, sounds or other imagery previously perceived.

ei·det·ic

(ī-det'ik)
1. Relating to the power of visualization of and memory for objects previously seen that peaks in children aged 8-10.
2. A person possessing this power to a high degree.
[G. eidon, saw (aorist of verb)]

eidetic

Strikingly vivid, detailed and accurate, allowing an extraordinarily lifelike imaging, or sometimes rehearing, of past experience.
References in periodicals archive ?
A series of experiments were conducted by a team of leading visual scientists from MIT, Harvard, and Bell Laboratories on a non-autistic eidetiker with reputedly unusually prodigious eidetic abilities.
Even more, one can trace the passage from phenomenology to hermeneutics in Ricoeur's own evolution: from an eidetic of volition to an interpretation of the experience of the ego; here, ego and volition become similar concepts.
1) It must be differentiated from similar phenomenon such as illusions (misperception of actual stimuli), elaborate fantasies, imaginary companions, and eidetic images (visual imag es stored in memory).
Eidetic refers to the figurative aspect of the choreographic body in its flowing of shapes (also when they are less recognizable and therefore can be better described as figural instead of figurative shapes); plastic conveys the reference to a movement which is tri-dimensional; dynamic refers to dance modulation of the movement energy which articulates expressive variety.
Bhart[hari's quest for a linguistic essence (Sabdabrahma) may be compared to the eidetic phenomenology of Edmund Husserl, which, in Halenstein's words is "concerned with the grasp of the essential features common to objects of the same category".
Dan Brown's The Lost Symbol continues the adventures of Robert Langdon, Harvard Professor of Symbology, a genius with an eidetic memory whose peculiar ability to interpret symbols lands him in hot water more often than his job description would lead you to suspect.
Paul Ricoeur sought to widen things out and to go beyond a phenomenology of perception when early in his career he set himself the task of applying Husserlian eidetic analysis to the theme of the voluntary and the involuntary.
Lilly is a "rememberer"; her gift of eidetic memory is an essential component in dispensing medicine.
Unassuming and quiet by nature, Aashish has what is called an eidetic memory, also known as a photographic memory and total recall.
Uniquely, the rear view mirror reflects an image that, on a casual glance, might appear to be brownish-colored clouds; on closer inspection, the mirror eidetic is a discernible map of the western world as it might appear from somewhere in space: Indeed this jacket-cover jettisons us right into the novel's opening scene with Bobby Bonaduce, Doing seventy, pointing north [on an interstate freeway in Maine], window wide open and elbow on the edge.