eidetic


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Related to eidetic: Eidetic imagery

eidetic

 [i-det´ik]
denoting exact visualization of events or objects previously seen; a person having such an ability.

ei·det·ic

(ī-det'ik),
1. Relating to the power of visualization of and memory for objects previously seen that reaches its height in children aged 8-10.
2. A person possessing this power to a high degree.
[G. eidon, saw (aorist of verb)]

eidetic

/ei·det·ic/ (i-det´ik) denoting exact visualization of events or objects previously seen; a person having such an ability.

eidetic

[īdet′ik]
Etymology: Gk, eidos, a form or shape seen
1 adj, pertaining to or characterized by the ability to visualize and reproduce accurately the image of objects or events previously seen or imagined.
2 n, a person possessing such ability.

eidetic

adjective Referring to vividly precise and accurate recollection of objects, events, sounds or other imagery previously perceived.

ei·det·ic

(ī-det'ik)
1. Relating to the power of visualization of and memory for objects previously seen that peaks in children aged 8-10.
2. A person possessing this power to a high degree.
[G. eidon, saw (aorist of verb)]

eidetic

Strikingly vivid, detailed and accurate, allowing an extraordinarily lifelike imaging, or sometimes rehearing, of past experience.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hence we see the place for Plato's eidetic realm, the so-called separate realm of the Forms, not in some separate heaven of abstract universals but in what Martin Buber has called "the earth of our bodily meetings.
Suffice here to recall the eidetic force of his descriptions, the ever-surprising originality and justness of his similes and metaphors, the light-handed shading of narration into meditation and vice versa, the exquisite handling of iteratio, variation, and praeteritio, the three figures of speech that have come to be a sort of trademark of his style.
King and Maxwell, both formerly with the Secret Service, are on their way to meet King's friend and mentor Ted Bergin, a lawyer who wants to hire them as investigators to help him fight the case of Edgar Roy, who has an eidetic memory and is America's foremost intelligence analyst.
Two methodological principles or definitions which have become central to phenomenology of religion are epoche and eidetic vision.
Digging up your precious (beautifully ambiguous word, that 'precious') eidetic images to divert and avoid.
And if there is, is it accessible to the naked intuition of the philosopher, to his analysis on the basis of given examples (which in phenomenology is called exemplary seeing or eidetic sight), or fictional ones (as in "thought experiments" that fall precisely within the category of exemplarily seeing)?
The new way of life generated a new consciousness and new artistic expressions, abstract symbols transcending the eidetic consciousness (5) of Paleolithic art whose greatest achievement lay in the unsurpassable realism of the cave paintings of Lascaux.
If anything, phenomenology replaces natural theology: rather than the world of Aristotelian possibility and actuality we are given Christianity (and other religions) as narratives of eidetic possibilities.
6/123, 440); the issue of the eidetic universality of its observations (see, e.
Dan Brown's The Lost Symbol continues the adventures of Robert Langdon, Harvard Professor of Symbology, a genius with an eidetic memory whose peculiar ability to interpret symbols lands him in hot water more often than his job description would lead you to suspect.
Stephen Sandy has provided a helpful note in Netsuke Days explaining the meaning of netsuke and its relationship to the short, eidetic lyrics in this book: "Netsuke-toggles, usually ivory, bone or wood; worn by men to secure items to sashes tied over kimono, which lack pockets.
Unassuming and quiet by nature, Aashish has what is called an eidetic memory, also known as a photographic memory and total recall.