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ego

 [e´go]
in psychoanalytic theory, one of the three major parts of the personality, the others being the id and the superego. The word ego is Latin for “I,” that is, self or individual as distinguished from other persons. The ego is represented by certain mental mechanisms, such as perception and memory, and specific defense mechanisms that are used to adjust to the demands of primitive instinctual drives (the id) and the demands of the external world (superego). The ego may be considered the psychologic aspect of one's personality, the id comprising the physiologic aspects and the superego the social aspects. The ego controls and directs an individual's actions and seeks compromises between the id impulses, social and parental prohibitions, and the pressures of reality.ƒ

The word ego also is commonly used to express conceit or self-centeredness. This should not be confused with the psychiatric meaning described above.

e·go

(ē'gō),
In freudian psychoanalysis, ego along with id and superego, are the three components of the psychic apparatus. It spans the conscious, preconscious, and unconscious; is the structure within the personality functioning in an executive capacity to mediate conflict between the id and the outside world, as part of the progression from the dominance of the pleasure principle to that of the reality principle and subsequently mediates the conflict between the id and superego and itself. It perceives from moment to moment external reality, needs of the self (both physical and psychological), integrates the perceptions and uses of logical, abstract, secondary process thinking, and the mechanisms of defense available to it to formulate a response.
[L. I]

ego

(e´go) that segment of the personality dominated by the reality principle, comprising integrative and executive aspects functioning to adapt the forces and pressures of the id and superego and the requirements of external reality by conscious perception, thought, and learning.

ego

(ē′gō)
n. pl. egos
1. The self, especially as distinct from the world and other selves.
2. In psychoanalysis, the division of the psyche that is conscious, most immediately controls thought and behavior, and is most in touch with external reality.
3.
a. An exaggerated sense of self-importance; conceit.
b. Appropriate pride in oneself; self-esteem.

ego

[ē′gō, eg′ō]
Etymology: Gk, I or self
1 the conscious sense of the self; those elements of a person, such as thinking, feeling, and willing, that distinguish him or her as an individual.
2 (in psychoanalysis) the part of the psyche that experiences and maintains conscious contact with reality and tempers the primitive drives of the id and the demands of the superego with the social and physical needs of society. It represents the rational element of the personality, is the seat of such mental processes as perception and memory, and develops defense mechanisms against anxiety. See also id, superego.

ego

Psychiatry A major division in the Freudian model of the psychic apparatus, the others being the id and superego; ego is the sum of some mental mechanisms–eg, perception and memory, specific defense mechanisms, and mediates the demands of primitive instinctual drives–the id, of intemalized parental and social prohibitions–the superego, and reality–the compromises between these forces achieved by the ego tend to resolve intrapsychic conflict and serve an adaptive and executive function Vox populi Self-love, selfishness

e·go

(ē'gō)
psychoanalysis One of the three components of the psychic apparatus in the freudian structural framework, the other two being the id and superego. The ego occupies a position between the primal instincts (pleasure principle) and the demands of the outer world (reality principle), and therefore mediates between the person and external reality by performing the important functions of perceiving the needs of the self, both physical and psychologic, and the qualities and attitudes of the environment. It is also responsible for certain defensive functions to protect the person against the demands of the id and superego.
[L. I]

ego

1. The Latin word for ‘I’.
2. A person's consciousness of self.
3. In Freudian terms, a kind of rational internal person largely at the mercy of the ‘id’ (German for ‘it’) with its wicked and mainly sexual drives, but sometimes saved from disaster by the virtuous ‘super-ego’. Freud changed his definition of the ego several times. See also FREUDIAN THEORY.
References in periodicals archive ?
We can decide to give ourselves the "greatest self-gift": open-ended, ever-expanding love that stretches our Ego to expand boundlessly.
If you have a coach with an inflated ego, what can you do?
The eGO can carry 240 pounds of rider and cargo,and it is capable of hauling a further 100 pounds in a trailer.
Ego state therapy is a therapeutic approach which recognizes that every individual incorporates numerous discreet ego states, with boundaries ranging from non-flexible to highly permeable, making up a "family of self' (Watkins & Watkins, 1982).
Both the Mirror and the Mirror's popularity are the products of trauma, a trauma that is the result of at least temporarily intolerable demands for an alteration of the ego.
When the ego's works are riven, shaken, turned upside down, we tend to lose "faith" in them, and this, from a biblical standpoint, is all to the good, for we are not designed to root ourselves in something as vacillating and tiny as the ego.
It's esthetic porn for overachievers, capturing the foul juices in which the ego simmers, unable to give itself over to a wholly hygienic admiration of the more gifted friend, or to the Universal.
If lines of communication between the executive ego and various subsystems break, divisions in consciousness occur, according to Hilgard's theory.
The notion that I grew up with as a devout Catholic that we should strive to crush our egos is, I submit, not only misdirected but precisely misdirected.
Keane talked with his Manchester United teammates regularly about England's problems and said: "There are too many egos now in the England set-up.
12 /PRNewswire/ -- According to Joel Epstein, "The Ego Guy," and author of The Little Book On Big Ego, "When big egos collide there's always friction -- good or bad -- and where there's friction, there's going to be fire.
ONE WOULD NEED a sharp knife to cut through the sexual tension radiating between office co-workers Carol (played by Adrianne Avey) and William (Jeremy Kent Jackson) in Joseph De Rosa's lightweight but disarming romantic comedy, ``An Evening With the Egos,'' having its world premiere at the Victory Theatre Center in Burbank.