egoist


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egoist

[ē′gō·ist, eg′-]
1 a selfish person, one who seeks to satisfy his or her own interests at the expense of others. See also egotist.
2 a person who believes in or acts in accordance with the concept that all conscious action is justifiably motivated by self-interest. egoistic, egoistical, adj.
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Conflicts of desires and wishes aren't relevant, the egoist will say.
If the egoist is to be the loner who cares not for others and doesn't even interact with them, a concept is necessarily required to describe, in contrast, the behavior of most (normal) people--that is, those concerned for other people, who care deeply for some of them (loved ones) and superficially for others of them (potential trading partners in a quid pro quo), even while caring little or not at all for many others besides (total strangers).
Assessing the strategy of considering Socrates as an egoist, Rudebusch says it is possible to interpret the Apology and Crito passages as subordinating virtue, duty, justice, and regard for others to my own happiness.
If this is possible, then the traditional answer that philosophy gives to the egoist loses its bite.
Welcoming then displaces and disrupts egoist subjectivity, making way for the Other's arrival.
The egoist is characterized by high-handed and arrogant behavior, obstinacy, opinionated vanity, and an unwillingness to correct errors, all signs of laxity, the inability to accept reversals or bear difficulties well, the fear of exertion, frequent complaints against setbacks and disappointments, and an exclusive search for material comfort.
Fixed Effects Tobit Regression Estimating the Amount Contributed in the Public Goods Experiment, by Subject Type Variable Egoist Model (SE) Altruist Model (SE) Intercept -2.
Our culture is one of rabid consumerism, egoist entitlement, video violence, cult of celebrity and seeking spiritual support from a Pilates mat.
Among so many editors and their fiefdoms--Harriet Shaw Weaver's The Egoist, Ford Madox Ford's Transatlantic Review, Harriet Monroe's Poetry, Margaret Anderson's The Little Review, Marianne Moore's The Dial, John Crowe Ransom's The Fugitive, Lincoln Kirstein's Hound and Horn, Eugene Jolas's Transition--the greatest autocrat was unquestionably T.
Her self-description was not entirely flattering: "a pessimist if I'm not careful, a feminist always, a Black, a quiet egoist, a former Baptist, and an oil-and-water combination of ambition, laziness, insecurity, certainty, and drive.
Nozick's justice as entitlement carried to the extreme is social Darwinism, which is less justice than egoist ethic).
egoist, benevolent, and principled) as they specify three distinct bases for moral judgment.