ego strength


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ego strength

(in psychotherapy) the ability to maintain the ego by a cluster of traits that together contribute to good mental health. The traits usually considered important include tolerance of the pain of loss, disappointment, shame, or guilt; forgiveness of those who have caused an injury, with feelings of compassion rather than anger and retaliation; acceptance of substitutes and ability to defer gratification; persistence and perseverance in the pursuit of goals; openness, flexibility, and creativity in learning to adapt; and vitality and power in the activities of life. The psychiatric prognosis for a client correlates positively with ego strength.

ego strength

In classical psychoanalytical theory, the ability of the ego to maintain its various functions, the prime one of which is to perceive reality and adapt to it.
See also: strength
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References in periodicals archive ?
With regard to identity formation during adolescence, Erikson (1968) posited that the ego strengths of will, purpose, and fidelity are of foremost importance for the resolution of the identity versus identity confusion crisis.
Despite the importance that Erikson gave to the ego strengths in the process of identity formation, empirical studies testing these theoretical claims have been almost completely absent from the literature (Markstrom et al.
Ego virtues were assessed by the Psychosocial Inventory of Ego Strengths (PIES; Markstrom et al.
Broadly stated, the "crisis" symptoms, as formulated by Erikson and as captured in the IEC factor, include reduced Ego Strength (negative loading of the Ego Strength scale), impulsivity and acting-out (positive loadings of Psychopathic Deviate, Hypomania, and McAndrew Alcoholism), heightened physical and somatic complaints (positive loading of Hypochondriasis and Hysteria).
The associations among the factor scores are all in the hypothesized direction, with only Ego Strength showing a negative association, as predicted.
The decline in ego strength implies a reduced capacity for coping with problems and stress.
One of my criteria relates to the patient's ego strengths.
In my opinion, the real secret to helping a special child achieve a rewarding adulthood has to do with the guidance and ego strengths they achieve as they grow.