ego orientation

ego orientation

a dispositional tendency to feel most successful in an activity only when one demonstrates one's ability relative to that of others, such as when one outperforms an opponent. See also achievement goal orientation, task orientation.
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Yet the present results indicate that ego orientation and preoccupation with social evaluation, also externally based, is unrelated to sport enjoyment.
In the present study, criterion validity is established if task orientation is positively associated with sportsmanship (hypothesis la), and negatively associated with gamesmanship (hypothesis 2a) and instrumental aggression (hypothesis 3a); and ego orientation is negatively associated with sportsmanship (hypothesis lb), and positively associated with gamesmanship (hypothesis 2b) and instrumental aggression (hypothesis 3b).
In the Achievement Goals Theory, Nicholls (1984, 1989) states there are two perspectives that predominate in the academic context, one being ego orientation and the other task orientation.
If one compares this with academic goal orientation, the ego orientation may be viewed as equivalent to the performance goal (Dweck, 1986; Ames, 1984) which, in other studies, is subdivided in two: the achievement goal and the social reinforcement goal (Hayamizu, Ito & Yohiazaki, 1989; Hayamizu & Weiner, 1991).
Setenta y dos hombres y mujeres, estudiantes de Ciencias de la Actividad Fisica y del Deporte de Zaragoza (Espana), respondieron el Cuestionario de Orientaciones Motivacionales en el Deporte (Guivernau & Duda, 1994, adaptacion espanola del Task and Ego Orientation in Sport Questionnaire, Duda, 1989).
In contrast, ego orientation is the propensity to judge one's ability with respect to the performance and to tie subjective success to the demonstration of super ability.
El Task and Ego Orientation in Sport Questionnaire (TEOSQ) ha sido utilizado en numerosas investigaciones para evaluar este constructo psicologico.
The Task and Ego Orientation in Sport Questionnaire (Duda and Nicholls, 1992) contains thirteen items: six indicating ego orientation and seven showing a task orientation.
The dispositional tendency to believe that ability is reflected through effort and improvement is known as a task orientation while an ego orientation reflects the view that ability is expressed by outperforming others.
In order to compare the athletes' of varying goal orientations on their perceptions of the motivational climate in the athletic training room, athletes needed to be grouped according to their task and ego orientation responses.
Task orientation is linked to IM, while ego orientation is linked to EM (Duda, Chi, Newton, Walling & Catley, 1995; Spray, Wang, Biddle, Chatsizarantis & Warburton, 2006; Wang, Chatzisarantis, Spray & Biddle, 2002).
Conversely, students with an ego orientation tend to orient themselves to achieve a positive evaluation of their current abilities and base their performance on a social comparison, so that they feel satisfaction when they establish superiority, i.