ego orientation

ego orientation

a dispositional tendency to feel most successful in an activity only when one demonstrates one's ability relative to that of others, such as when one outperforms an opponent. See also achievement goal orientation, task orientation.
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In contrast, ego orientation is the propensity to judge one's ability with respect to the performance and to tie subjective success to the demonstration of super ability.
Alternatively, several empirical findings examining relationships between ego orientation and PA related outcomes have been inconsistent (see review by Roberts et al.
The orthogonal variable of high low task and ego orientation was created using the median score for each variable and assigning a score of one, two, three, or four if they were high in both, high task low ego, high ego low task, or low in both respectively.
The targeted external criteria were variation in the emphasis placed on task and ego goals as measured by an established dichotomous goal questionnaire, namely the Task and Ego Orientation in Sport Questionnaire (Duda, 1989), as well as effort and ability beliefs regarding the causes of success (Duda & White, 1992).
Ego orientation, in contrast, is positively associated with the belief that the possession of ability and the use of deceptive tactics are antecedents to success.
Students in a research classroom studied by Carter and Norwood (1997) believed different factors such as task orientation, ego orientation, and extrinsic motivation scales were also important in mathematics success.
The Task and Ego Orientation in Sport Questionnaire (TEOSQ) (Duda & Nicholls, 1989) was used to assess individual differences in the tendency to identify with ego and task goals within the competitive sport setting.
Previous studies have shown that ego orientation is another factor in ballgame brutality.
In order to compare the athletes' of varying goal orientations on their perceptions of the motivational climate in the athletic training room, athletes needed to be grouped according to their task and ego orientation responses.
However, in experienced children and adults, ego orientation was higher in judokas when compared to aikidokas.
Specifically, task orientation has been consistently associated with adaptive achievement-related outcomes such as intrinsic motivation, persistence in the face of failure, positive attribution patterns, enjoyment, and effort in both sport and educational settings, whereas ego orientation has been related to maladaptive outcomes such as decreased intrinsic motivation and withdrawal of effort in the face of failure (see Ames, 1992; Biddle, Wang, Kavussanu, & Spray, 2003; Dweck, 1986).
An ego orientation, rather, reflects a tendency to dwell on social comparison of ability and outcome, such as outperforming others on tasks of normative difficulty (Nicholls, 1989).