ego ideal


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ideal

 [i-de´al]
a pattern or concept of perfection.
ego ideal the component of the superego containing the internalized image of what one desires to become, which the ego strives to attain. It is formed through conscious or unconscious identification with a person who plays a significant role or has a place of esteem in the life of the developing child, or through emulation of such a person.

ego ideal

n.
In psychoanalysis, the part of one's ego that contains an idealized self based on those people, especially parents and peers, one admires and wishes to emulate.

ego ideal

the image of the self to which a person aspires both consciously and unconsciously and against which he or she measures himself or herself and judges personal performance. It is usually based on a positive identification with the significant and influential figures of the early childhood years. See also identification.

e·go i·deal

(ē'gō ī-dēl')
The part of the personality that comprises the goals, aspirations, and aims of the self, usually growing out of the emulation of a significant person with whom one has identified.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Indeed, "In Lacanian terms," says Zizek, "the suspension of the Ego Ideal, of the feature of symbolic identification--that is, the reduction of the Master to an imaginary ideal--necessarily gives rise to its monstrous obverse, to the superego figure of the omnipotent Evil Genius who controls our lives.
He says that the ego ideal is conjured up by the maturing subject as a means of recapturing the narcissism of infancy:
He is not willing to forgo the narcissistic perfection of his childhood; and when, as he grows up, he is disturbed by the admonitions of others and by the awakening of his own critical judgement, so that he can no longer retain that perfection, he seeks to recover it in the new form of an ego ideal.
As we have seen, the subject is said to project the ego ideal because he is "incapable of giving up a satisfaction he had once enjoyed" or of "forgo[ing] the narcissistic perfection of his childhood.
41) By eliding the gap between these senses, Freud gives libido theory the semblance of explaining why a child would begin life with a favorable self-assessment, whose loss to external criticism would then oblige him to project an ego ideal.
it is the very symbolic function of the father which is increasingly undermined--that is, which is losing its performative efficiency; for that reason, a father is no longer perceived as one's Ego Ideal, the (more or less failed, inadequate) bearer of symbolic authority, but as one's ideal ego, imaginary competitor.
In summary, the contemporary decline of the ego ideal brought on by the rise of scientific knowledge does not dispense with the superego but actually frees it to reign -without restriction.
In Lacanian terms: the suspension of the Ego Ideal, of the feature of symbolic identification--that is, the reduction of the Master to an imaginary ideal--necessarily gives rise to its monstrous obverse, to the superego figure of the omnipotent Evil Genius who controls our lives.
The notion that there can be a superego without that symbolic identification which forms an ego ideal is an assertion of Zizek's rather than something established within Lacanian theory (the paranoiac's 'Other of the Other' is definitely not the superego).
identification with the fantasy ideal ego of a permanent, perfect, all-powerful and immortal self, made the more painful by obvious discrepancies in comparison with an unattainable primordial ego ideal.
This ego ideal strengthening can lead to inflation and self-importance, however, unless it is balanced by a humbling recognition of the illusory nature of the ideal ego.
765), finally leaving behind the remnants of ego ideal and ideal ego.