ego


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ego

 [e´go]
in psychoanalytic theory, one of the three major parts of the personality, the others being the id and the superego. The word ego is Latin for “I,” that is, self or individual as distinguished from other persons. The ego is represented by certain mental mechanisms, such as perception and memory, and specific defense mechanisms that are used to adjust to the demands of primitive instinctual drives (the id) and the demands of the external world (superego). The ego may be considered the psychologic aspect of one's personality, the id comprising the physiologic aspects and the superego the social aspects. The ego controls and directs an individual's actions and seeks compromises between the id impulses, social and parental prohibitions, and the pressures of reality.ƒ

The word ego also is commonly used to express conceit or self-centeredness. This should not be confused with the psychiatric meaning described above.

e·go

(ē'gō),
In freudian psychoanalysis, ego along with id and superego, are the three components of the psychic apparatus. It spans the conscious, preconscious, and unconscious; is the structure within the personality functioning in an executive capacity to mediate conflict between the id and the outside world, as part of the progression from the dominance of the pleasure principle to that of the reality principle and subsequently mediates the conflict between the id and superego and itself. It perceives from moment to moment external reality, needs of the self (both physical and psychological), integrates the perceptions and uses of logical, abstract, secondary process thinking, and the mechanisms of defense available to it to formulate a response.
[L. I]

ego

(e´go) that segment of the personality dominated by the reality principle, comprising integrative and executive aspects functioning to adapt the forces and pressures of the id and superego and the requirements of external reality by conscious perception, thought, and learning.

ego

(ē′gō)
n. pl. egos
1. The self, especially as distinct from the world and other selves.
2. In psychoanalysis, the division of the psyche that is conscious, most immediately controls thought and behavior, and is most in touch with external reality.
3.
a. An exaggerated sense of self-importance; conceit.
b. Appropriate pride in oneself; self-esteem.

ego

[ē′gō, eg′ō]
Etymology: Gk, I or self
1 the conscious sense of the self; those elements of a person, such as thinking, feeling, and willing, that distinguish him or her as an individual.
2 (in psychoanalysis) the part of the psyche that experiences and maintains conscious contact with reality and tempers the primitive drives of the id and the demands of the superego with the social and physical needs of society. It represents the rational element of the personality, is the seat of such mental processes as perception and memory, and develops defense mechanisms against anxiety. See also id, superego.

ego

Psychiatry A major division in the Freudian model of the psychic apparatus, the others being the id and superego; ego is the sum of some mental mechanisms–eg, perception and memory, specific defense mechanisms, and mediates the demands of primitive instinctual drives–the id, of intemalized parental and social prohibitions–the superego, and reality–the compromises between these forces achieved by the ego tend to resolve intrapsychic conflict and serve an adaptive and executive function Vox populi Self-love, selfishness

e·go

(ē'gō)
psychoanalysis One of the three components of the psychic apparatus in the freudian structural framework, the other two being the id and superego. The ego occupies a position between the primal instincts (pleasure principle) and the demands of the outer world (reality principle), and therefore mediates between the person and external reality by performing the important functions of perceiving the needs of the self, both physical and psychologic, and the qualities and attitudes of the environment. It is also responsible for certain defensive functions to protect the person against the demands of the id and superego.
[L. I]

ego

1. The Latin word for ‘I’.
2. A person's consciousness of self.
3. In Freudian terms, a kind of rational internal person largely at the mercy of the ‘id’ (German for ‘it’) with its wicked and mainly sexual drives, but sometimes saved from disaster by the virtuous ‘super-ego’. Freud changed his definition of the ego several times. See also FREUDIAN THEORY.
References in periodicals archive ?
those who have ego depletion and a lower construal level) would focus more on the subordinate feature of the goal and, thus, would prefer an uncertain short-term goal to a long-term certain goal.
The athletes first took the Task and Ego Orientation in Sport Questionnaire (TEOSQ).
And as for avid multi-taskers, Torque has prepared the EGO Surf i and EGO Max i, both of which come with 1GB RAM as standard.
It is easy to make the mistake to take that ego - should you possess it - off the pitch.
Quantitative Data Collection: The Personal Information Form and the Ego State Scale were used together to collect the quantitative data.
Georgina said: "Since launching EGO Arts Venue, we've really cemented EGO's place within Coventry's community - not just for providing performance opportunities for all ages and backgrounds, but also as a popular hive of culture, creativity and entertainment.
EGO Pakistan 2015 is planned to advance exchange between nations keeping in mind the end goal to help the casing of economy.
In light of the above literature on innovation, as well as the network effects thereof, we define ego network innovation as follows: the collective transfer and integration of knowledge that exists within, and is derived from, the ego network in which firms are embedded that leads to innovation output for the entire ego network.
Nazih Hamad, managing director of Nazih Group, said: "Alter Ego Italy is a salon exclusive brand - both in product as well as belief.
The ego is the organised part of the personality structure that includes defensive, perceptual, intellectual-cognitive, and executive functions (reasonable).
Ego state therapists assume the personality is composed of parts, called ego states (Emmerson, 2011a; Federn, 1952; Watkins & Watkins, 1997).
Two stand out performers in the first half where Mark James of Daniel and Mike Reed, the goalkeeper for Jamie's Ego, as both were locked in a private battle to outdo one another.