effusion

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effusion

 [ĕ-fu´zhun]
1. escape of a fluid into a part; exudation or transudation.
2. an exudate or transudate.
chyliform effusion see chylothorax.
chylous effusion see chylothorax.
pericardial effusion the accumulation of an abnormally large amount of pericardial fluid in the pericardium.
Accumulated fluid from a pericardial effusion evacuated by the subxiphoid approach to pericardiocentesis. From Polaski and Tatro, 1996.
pleural effusion see pleural effusion.
pseudochylous effusion see chylothorax.

ef·fu·sion

(e-fyū'zhŭn),
1. The escape of fluid from the blood vessels or lymphatics into the tissues or a cavity.
2. A collection of the fluid effused.
[L. effusio, a pouring out]

effusion

/ef·fu·sion/ (ĕ-fu´zhun)
1. escape of a fluid into a part; exudation or transudation.
2. effused material; an exudate or transudate.

pleural effusion  fluid in the pleural space.

effusion

(ĭ-fyo͞o′zhən)
n.
1.
a. The act or an instance of effusing.
b. Liquid or other matter poured forth.
2. Medicine
a. The seeping of serous, purulent, or bloody fluid into a body cavity or tissue.
b. The effused fluid.

effusion

[ifyo̅o̅′zhən]
Etymology: L, effundere, to pour out
1 the escape of fluid, for example, from blood vessels as a result of rupture or seepage, usually into a body cavity. The condition is usually associated with a circulatory or renal disorder and is often an early sign of congestive heart disease. The term may be associated with an affected body area, as pleural or pericardial effusion. See also edema, transudate.
2 the outward spread of a bacterial growth.

effusion

Accumulation of fluid in various spaces of the body, or the knee itself, which is a frequent byproduct of injury. See Ascites, Peritoneal effusion, Pleural effusion, Pseudochylous effusion, Subdural effusion.

ef·fu·sion

(e-fyu'zhŭn)
1. The escape of fluid from the blood vessels or lymphatics into the tissues or a cavity.
2. A collection of the fluid effused.
[L. effusio, a pouring out]

effusion

1. Movement of fluid from its usual situation, to form a collection elsewhere.
2. The collection of fluid in an abnormal site, as in a pleural effusion, a pericardial effusion or a joint effusion.

Effusion

The escape of fluid from blood vessels or the lymphatic system and its collection in a cavity, in this case, the middle ear.

effusion

extravasation of fluid into body tissues or cavities, such as a pleural effusion, or into joints where it causes swelling. In sport a joint effusion is a sign of significant damage to the joint. A knee filled with blood, rather than with joint (synovial) fluid, is called a haemarthrosis, an injury requiring immediate care (e.g. cruciate ligament damage in the knee).

effusion

escape of fluid or plasma from blood or lymphatic vessels into tissues, e.g. acute inflammatory response

effusion,

n flow of fluid (i.e., blood) into a body cavity; can be an indication of congestive heart disease.

ef·fu·sion

(e-fyu'zhŭn)
1. Escape of fluid from blood vessels or lymphatics into tissues or cavity.
2. Collection of effused fluid.
[L. effusio, a pouring out]

effusion

1. escape of a fluid into a part; exudation or transudation. See also specific anatomic sites.
2. an exudate or transudate.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the most common causes of exudative pleural effusion in India and pleural effusion is the second most common site of extrapulmonary TB after lymph node.
The diagnostic utility of ADA in tuberculous pleural effusions has been evaluated.
In this prospective observational study we evaluated the clinical symptoms in patients who presented with early or late significant pericardial effusion after cardiac surgery and underwent its open drainage in our institution.
Clinical examination and chest X-ray disclosed a significant right pleural effusion (Fig.
Diagnosis and management of malignant pleural effusions.
5) Pitfalls in the determination of pleural effusions, regardless of patient positioning, include overlying soft tissue, atelectasis, extrapleural fat, pericardial fat, and pleural thickening.
In conclusion, PMPM should be included in the differential diagnosis of large pericardial effusions and cardiac tamponade and should be suspected in cases of refractory pericardial effusion despite appropriate anti-inflammatory treatment.
Five cases of clinically important pleural effusions in patients with PM-DM have been reported.
Pericardial effusion was confirmed by echocardiography.
According to the composition of the pleural fluid, pleural effusions are classically divided in two type transudates and exudates.
However, high FADA levels can also occur in other disease conditions and particularly in empyemas, lymphomas, carcinomas and parapneumonic effusions due to proliferation of large numbers of neutrophils and lymphocytes in these conditions, resulting in false-positive results and misdiagnosis.