effusion

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Related to effusions: Intercondylar

effusion

 [ĕ-fu´zhun]
1. escape of a fluid into a part; exudation or transudation.
2. an exudate or transudate.
chyliform effusion see chylothorax.
chylous effusion see chylothorax.
pericardial effusion the accumulation of an abnormally large amount of pericardial fluid in the pericardium.
Accumulated fluid from a pericardial effusion evacuated by the subxiphoid approach to pericardiocentesis. From Polaski and Tatro, 1996.
pleural effusion see pleural effusion.
pseudochylous effusion see chylothorax.

ef·fu·sion

(e-fyū'zhŭn),
1. The escape of fluid from the blood vessels or lymphatics into the tissues or a cavity.
2. A collection of the fluid effused.
[L. effusio, a pouring out]

effusion

/ef·fu·sion/ (ĕ-fu´zhun)
1. escape of a fluid into a part; exudation or transudation.
2. effused material; an exudate or transudate.

pleural effusion  fluid in the pleural space.

effusion

(ĭ-fyo͞o′zhən)
n.
1.
a. The act or an instance of effusing.
b. Liquid or other matter poured forth.
2. Medicine
a. The seeping of serous, purulent, or bloody fluid into a body cavity or tissue.
b. The effused fluid.

effusion

[ifyo̅o̅′zhən]
Etymology: L, effundere, to pour out
1 the escape of fluid, for example, from blood vessels as a result of rupture or seepage, usually into a body cavity. The condition is usually associated with a circulatory or renal disorder and is often an early sign of congestive heart disease. The term may be associated with an affected body area, as pleural or pericardial effusion. See also edema, transudate.
2 the outward spread of a bacterial growth.

effusion

Accumulation of fluid in various spaces of the body, or the knee itself, which is a frequent byproduct of injury. See Ascites, Peritoneal effusion, Pleural effusion, Pseudochylous effusion, Subdural effusion.

ef·fu·sion

(e-fyu'zhŭn)
1. The escape of fluid from the blood vessels or lymphatics into the tissues or a cavity.
2. A collection of the fluid effused.
[L. effusio, a pouring out]

effusion

1. Movement of fluid from its usual situation, to form a collection elsewhere.
2. The collection of fluid in an abnormal site, as in a pleural effusion, a pericardial effusion or a joint effusion.

Effusion

The escape of fluid from blood vessels or the lymphatic system and its collection in a cavity, in this case, the middle ear.

effusion

extravasation of fluid into body tissues or cavities, such as a pleural effusion, or into joints where it causes swelling. In sport a joint effusion is a sign of significant damage to the joint. A knee filled with blood, rather than with joint (synovial) fluid, is called a haemarthrosis, an injury requiring immediate care (e.g. cruciate ligament damage in the knee).

effusion

escape of fluid or plasma from blood or lymphatic vessels into tissues, e.g. acute inflammatory response

effusion,

n flow of fluid (i.e., blood) into a body cavity; can be an indication of congestive heart disease.

ef·fu·sion

(e-fyu'zhŭn)
1. Escape of fluid from blood vessels or lymphatics into tissues or cavity.
2. Collection of effused fluid.
[L. effusio, a pouring out]

effusion

1. escape of a fluid into a part; exudation or transudation. See also specific anatomic sites.
2. an exudate or transudate.
References in periodicals archive ?
Five cases of clinically important pleural effusions in patients with PM-DM have been reported.
1, 2015 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Spontaneous knee effusion, also known as "water on the knee," can be a primary symptom of Lyme disease, even when patients do not exhibit a "bull's eye" rash, another common Lyme disease symptom.
Case of myxoedema with a huge pericardial effusion and cardiac tamponade.
16) Difficulty of diagnosis of mesothelioma in dogs is attributed to clinical signs related to cavitary effusions rather than development of a discrete mass.
The pleurapump system is a fully implantable battery-powered pump system that automatically and continually moves chronic pleural effusions from the pleural space around the lungs to the bladder, where it is passed naturally from the body.
To determine (i) the positive predictive value (PPV) of high FADA test results for PTB; (ii) the most common causes of FPs and the demographic characteristics of tuberculous pleural effusions (TPEs) and non-tuberculous pleural effusions (NTPEs); (iii) the frequency of TPEs in HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients with pleural effusions; and (iv) the FADA levels in TPEs and NTPEs and in HIV-positive and -negative patients.
The causes of pleural effusions can be classified as either a transudate (Table 1) or an exudate (Table 2).
Shortness of breath responded to this therapy, but he had radiological persistence of bilateral pleural effusions (Table 1).
The role of thoracoscopy in the evaluation and management of pleural effusions.
4) Pericardial rubs may present transiently but it can persist in large effusions.
Glutathione for the effusions and ascites: in my 7 years of using glutathione, I have found it the most effective agent for resolving pulmonary edema, pleural effusions and ascites .