effusion


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Related to effusion: pleural effusion, Pericardial effusion

effusion

 [ĕ-fu´zhun]
1. escape of a fluid into a part; exudation or transudation.
2. an exudate or transudate.
chyliform effusion see chylothorax.
chylous effusion see chylothorax.
pericardial effusion the accumulation of an abnormally large amount of pericardial fluid in the pericardium.
Accumulated fluid from a pericardial effusion evacuated by the subxiphoid approach to pericardiocentesis. From Polaski and Tatro, 1996.
pleural effusion see pleural effusion.
pseudochylous effusion see chylothorax.

ef·fu·sion

(e-fyū'zhŭn),
1. The escape of fluid from the blood vessels or lymphatics into the tissues or a cavity.
2. A collection of the fluid effused.
[L. effusio, a pouring out]

effusion

/ef·fu·sion/ (ĕ-fu´zhun)
1. escape of a fluid into a part; exudation or transudation.
2. effused material; an exudate or transudate.

pleural effusion  fluid in the pleural space.

effusion

(ĭ-fyo͞o′zhən)
n.
1.
a. The act or an instance of effusing.
b. Liquid or other matter poured forth.
2. Medicine
a. The seeping of serous, purulent, or bloody fluid into a body cavity or tissue.
b. The effused fluid.

effusion

[ifyo̅o̅′zhən]
Etymology: L, effundere, to pour out
1 the escape of fluid, for example, from blood vessels as a result of rupture or seepage, usually into a body cavity. The condition is usually associated with a circulatory or renal disorder and is often an early sign of congestive heart disease. The term may be associated with an affected body area, as pleural or pericardial effusion. See also edema, transudate.
2 the outward spread of a bacterial growth.

effusion

Accumulation of fluid in various spaces of the body, or the knee itself, which is a frequent byproduct of injury. See Ascites, Peritoneal effusion, Pleural effusion, Pseudochylous effusion, Subdural effusion.

ef·fu·sion

(e-fyu'zhŭn)
1. The escape of fluid from the blood vessels or lymphatics into the tissues or a cavity.
2. A collection of the fluid effused.
[L. effusio, a pouring out]

effusion

1. Movement of fluid from its usual situation, to form a collection elsewhere.
2. The collection of fluid in an abnormal site, as in a pleural effusion, a pericardial effusion or a joint effusion.

Effusion

The escape of fluid from blood vessels or the lymphatic system and its collection in a cavity, in this case, the middle ear.

effusion

extravasation of fluid into body tissues or cavities, such as a pleural effusion, or into joints where it causes swelling. In sport a joint effusion is a sign of significant damage to the joint. A knee filled with blood, rather than with joint (synovial) fluid, is called a haemarthrosis, an injury requiring immediate care (e.g. cruciate ligament damage in the knee).

effusion

escape of fluid or plasma from blood or lymphatic vessels into tissues, e.g. acute inflammatory response

effusion,

n flow of fluid (i.e., blood) into a body cavity; can be an indication of congestive heart disease.

ef·fu·sion

(e-fyu'zhŭn)
1. Escape of fluid from blood vessels or lymphatics into tissues or cavity.
2. Collection of effused fluid.
[L. effusio, a pouring out]

effusion

1. escape of a fluid into a part; exudation or transudation. See also specific anatomic sites.
2. an exudate or transudate.
References in periodicals archive ?
Half of patients do not recall a tick bite or observe a rash, and early symptoms are not always detected when a physician diagnoses a knee effusion," said Dr.
Imaging revealed cardiomegaly (Figure 2a), a large pericardial effusion and pneumatosis intestinalis of the ascending colon (Figure 2b), and global cardiomyopathy with an ejection fraction of 25% to 30% (Figures 2c, 2d).
1]] finds autoinflation with easy-to-use nasal balloon, Otovent, an effective treatment for otitis media with effusion (commonly referred to as Glue Ear).
Examination revealed an effusion in the left middle ear with a Sade grade 2 pars tensa retraction and a Tos stage 4 self-cleansing attic retraction pocket; an erosion of the long process of the incus was also observed (figure).
2) In contrast to the frequent ILD involvement in patients with CADM, development of pleural effusion is uncommon.
Both groups elicited a reduction >50% in the presence of joint swelling; a similar reduction was seen for effusion.
Pericardial effusion was confirmed by echocardiography.
US synovial thickening, effusion, and power Doppler signal (PDS) were scored on a validated 3-point scale, with 3 being severe.
tuberculosis complex in fluid or biopsy specimen by culture; histological evidence of granulomas and positive stain for acid-fast bacilli (AFB) in pleural biopsy; and/ or positive sputum or gastric wash-out culture with clinical and radiological evidence of TB without any other cause for pleural effusion.
Contract notice: supply of a nuclearised e+b knudsen effusion mass spectrometer (kems).
The presence of a pleural effusion can be clinically detected only after the fluid volume reaches 300 - 350 ml, (4) but in the event of small volumes the sensitivity and specificity in its detection rates remain low.