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ef·fi·cien·cy

(e-fish'en-sē),
1. The production of the desired effects or results with minimum waste of time, money, effort, or skill.
2. A measure of effectiveness; specifically, the useful work output divided by the energy input.

efficiency

[ifish′ənsē]
1 the production of desired results with the minimum waste of time and effort.
2 the amount of achievement compared with the effort expended.
3 (in radioassay) the counts perceived by a beta or gamma counter relative to the known disintegration rate of a comparable standard radioactive source.

efficiency

Lab medicine The relative ability of a test to detect a disease, while maintaining the rate of false positive results to a minimum; the efficiency of a test is defined as the number of true positives and true negatives multiplied by one hundred, divided by the sum of true positives, true negatives, false positives and false negatives. Cf Four cell diagnostic matrix.

ef·fi·cien·cy

(ĕ-fish'ĕn-sē)
1. The production of the desired effects or results with minimum waste of time, effort, or skill.
2. A measure of effectiveness; specifically, the useful work output divided by the energy input.

efficiency

the ratio of energy (or work) output by a body or device to the energy input required. mechanical efficiency the ratio of mechanical energy output (or work output) to the energy input.

ef·fi·cien·cy

(ĕ-fish'ĕn-sē)
1. Production of desired effects or results with minimum waste of time, money, effort, or skill.
2. Measure of effectiveness; specifically, useful work output divided by the energy input.

efficiency,

n the operation of a dental practice in such a way that both business and professional services are performed in a minimal amount of time without sacrificing quality of work, sympathetic attitude, and kindliness.

efficiency

1. in clinical practice equals the effect achieved in relation to the expenditure and effort expended.
2. in physiological terms, efficiency of any organ or tissue is equal to the ratio of useful energy produced to total energy expended.

Patient discussion about efficiency

Q. Is electric shock efficient for ocd? Is it dangerous? My husband has OCD for 15 years now. He was also diagnosed with mania-depressia. He takes so many medications and nothing really helps. We were offered to try electric shock and I'm scared. Is it dangerous? What are the chances of this method to work for him?

A. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is indeed considered effective for OCD, although it's not the first line of treatment. It does have its risks, including memory loss, disorientation and sort of confusion. There is also a change in the activity of the heart but it's rarely significant.

Generally it can be said that it's not an absolutely safe treatment, but it may help, especially if other drugs don't help.

You may read more here:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003324.htm

More discussions about efficiency
References in periodicals archive ?
In reality there are several circumstances which disturb these correlations: the registration efficiencies of the detectors are different because of different areas; there is an effect of reflection of UCN from materials which does not depend on the polarization of the neutrons and decreases the efficiency of the polarization analysis; and the analyzing power of the detector depends on the properties of the analyzing ferromagnetic foil.
Licht and his coworkers say that besides besting the solar-to-hydrogen conversion record, their work opens the way to efficiencies not considered possible before.
wet scrubbers and baghouses are the most commonly used devices for removing particulate from cupola exhaust gas, and typical efficiencies for removing particulates in baghouses exceeds 99%, with scrubbers and afterburners removing 95%;
Our ability to support three WCDMA carriers while achieving power efficiencies approaching 50% is unmatched by any other technology vendor, and we are continuing to push the bandwidth and efficiency envelope.
The energy productivity of the economy has become somewhat better, due to the wakeup call of the energy price shocks and shortages of the '70s, which caused people to think about energy in their purchasing practices and design efficiencies.
Holmes, both at Cambridge and coauthors of the current report, and their colleagues first reported polymer electroluminescence, but with impractically low efficiencies.
Hotels are a market where advanced control systems and high unit efficiencies are of particular concern, as energy is reported to be the second highest overhead cost within the hotel industry.