edge

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edge

(ej),
A line at which a surface terminates.
See also: border, margin.

edge

[ej]
Etymology: ME, egge
1 a thin side or border.
2 the end of a surface, e.g., the edge of a cliff.

edge

A margin or border.

bevel edge

A tooth edge produced by beveling.

cutting edge

An angled or sharpened edge for cutting, as an incisor tooth or the blade of a knife.

denture edge

The margin or border of a denture.

incisal edge

The sharpened edge of a tooth produced by occlusal wear; the labiolingual margin.

edge

(ej)
Line at which surface terminates.
See also: border, margin
References in periodicals archive ?
Home fans, instead of breaking into raucous song, edgily look at their watches calculating how many minutes before they can reasonably expect a drink.
He was in the company of some rather quirky Americans, one called Tim, who decided to take a Siberian tiger out of his cage, put him on a leash and sit just metres from where Louis lurked edgily.
So, with Bean (at his most woodenly uninvolved) and Sarsgaard barely adding up to a complete characterisation between them, it's to the credit of both Foster (all tight jawed protective mom intensity) and German director Robert Schwentke that until the pieces fall into place and Kyle goes into Bruce Willis mode it's actually really rather edgily compelling
Lee edgily explores the possibilities of reconciliation.
And even longer, flirting edgily with both sunstroke and becoming road kill, before we fetched up at the place we'd intended.
It must be a shade disquieting that they are doing so as edgily as they are.
Both Bob and Wendy were good people, both now happily married with grown-up families and able to laugh edgily about that balmy summer night when the Beatles were young.
Yet Marber's unflagging energy keeps his play edgily enjoyable right up to its angry, fatalistic conclusion.
However, in the hands of director Susanne Bier and her cowriter, Anders Thomas Jensen (who also penned Mifune), this latest Danish contribution to the Dogme canon proves to be an unsentimental, nervously tense, edgily humorous and thoroughly honest look at the unpredictable emotional entanglements grief, guilt, vulnerability and longing can produce.