ectromelia


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ectromelia

 [ek″tro-me´le-ah]
gross hypoplasia or aplasia of one or more long bones of one or more limbs. adj., adj ectromel´ic.

ec·tro·me·li·a

(ek'trō-mē'lē-ă),
1. Congenital hypoplasia or aplasia of one or more limbs.
2. A disease of mice caused by the ectromelia virus, a member of the family Poxviridae; characterized by gangrenous loss of feet and by necrotic areas in the internal organs; in laboratory mouse colonies, it usually results in high mortality rates.
[ectro- + G. melos, limb]

ectromelia

/ec·tro·me·lia/ (ek″tro-me´le-ah) gross hypoplasia or aplasia of one or more long bones of one or more limbs.ectromel´ic

ectromelia

[ek′trōmē′lyə]
Etymology: Gk, ektrosis + melos, limb
the congenital absence or incomplete development of the long bones of one or more of the limbs. Kinds of ectromelia are amelia, hemimelia, and phocomelia. ectromelic, adj., ectromelus, n.

ec·tro·me·li·a

(ek'trō-mē'lē-ă)
1. Congenital hypoplasia or aplasia of one or more limbs.
2. A disease of mice caused by the ectromelia virus; characterized by gangrenous loss of feet and necrotic areas in the internal organs; in laboratory mouse colonies, it usually results in high mortality rates.
[ectro- + G. melos, limb]

ectromelia

congenital absence of one or more limbs

ectromelia

1. gross hypoplasia or aplasia of one or more long bones of one or more limbs.
2. a generalized poxvirus disease of mice resembling smallpox in humans. Used in studies as a model of generalized virus infections.
References in periodicals archive ?
CMLV, camelpox virus; CPXV, cowpox virus; ECTV, ectromelia virus; MPXV, monkeypox virus; OPV, orthopoxvirus; TATV, taterapox virus; VACV, vaccinia virus; VARV, variola virus.
The probes were also able to detect ectromelia virus but with a lower sensitivity (data not shown).
We evaluated the specificity of the PPV real-time PCR assay by use of DNA from several viruses, including orthopoxviruses (vaccinia, cowpox, monkeypox, ectromelia, and camelpox virus), molluscum contagiosum virus, yaba-like disease virus, human herpesviruses types 1 to 8, and adenoviruses.
Expression of mouse interleukin-4 by a recombinant ectromelia virus suppresses cytolytic responses and overcomes genetic resistance to mousepox.
A panel of 15 lyophilized plasma samples to which gamma-irradiated, heat-inactivated orthopox viruses (MPV, CPV, VAC, CML, and ectromelia virus) had been added was provided by the European Network for the Diagnosis of Imported Viral Diseases (ENIVD; Berlin, Germany).
Initially, they worked on ectromelia virus infection in mice (to explain his work, Frank coined the term mousepox).
The identity/similarity scores of the complete nucleotide sequences of crmB and hemagglutinin genes from patient A, in relation to other OPVs, were, respectively, Ectromelia (AF012825), 0.
Most malformations (47%) involved ectromelia (absence of all or part of a limb), ectrodactyly (absence of all or part of a digit) of the hindlimb, or asymmetrical development of hindlimbs (Figure 2, Table 2).
The formation of A-type inclusion bodies is restricted to cells infected with CPXV, ectromelia virus, and raccoonpox virus.
Today, technology allows genetic engineering of potentially devastating agents such as modified ectromelia virus (2), the weaponizing variola virus (former USSR) (3), the long distance dispersal of yellow fever-infested mosquitos (United States) (4), and the weaponizing of anthrax spores by many nations.
Although the formation of typical A-type inclusions is restricted to cells infected with cowpox virus, ectromelia virus, and raccoonpox virus (2), the sequence coding the N-terminus of the protein is highly conserved in many viruses, including CPXV, VACV, variola virus, camelpox virus, and ectromelia virus.