ecological equivalent

ecological equivalent

one of two species that have arisen from the same ancestral stock which have evolved in similar environments and have the same adaptive characters.
References in periodicals archive ?
As an ecological equivalent of Roosevelt's response to the Great Depression of the 1930s, the Green New Deal suggested that the economic crisis represented an opportunity to build a new type of economy, within which the creation of economic prosperity was not senselessly decoupled from environmental issues (cf.
Any one of those resource overdrafts--the ecological equivalent of a double mortgage and four credit cards--is folly.
The ecological equivalent for this variable--percent unemployed--was insignificantly correlated with census tract rates of problem behaviour and, having a negative correlation coefficient, disagreed with the family-level result with respect to the direction of the relationship.
In the ecological equivalent of the dreaded Klez Worm burrowing into computers around the world, European earthworms are eating enough leaf litter in North American forests to put a rare fern at risk of extinction.
Without the challenge of a viable alternative candidate, he is making "minor" concessions that are the ecological equivalent of the "death of a thousand cuts.
The work on acid rain and phosphates won a Stockholm Water Prize, the ecological equivalent of the Nobel Prize, for researcher Dr.
The basic value of a sustainable society, though, the ecological equivalent of the Golden Rule, is simple: Each generation should meet its needs without jeopardizing the prospects of future generations to meet their own needs.