ecocide


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ecocide

(ē′kō-sīd′, ĕk′ō-)
n.
Heedless or deliberate destruction of the natural environment, as by pollutants or an act of war.
Any environmental ‘holocaust’ committed by irresponsible parties, considered in tandem with the health costs of a degraded ecosystem

ecocide

(ĕk″ō-sīd′) [Gr. oikos, house, + L. caedere, to kill]
Willful destruction of some portion of the environment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ecocide is "damage, destruction and loss of ecosystems so extensive that peaceful enjoyment of a territory by the inhabitants is severely diminished or lost.
Ecocide challenges international law and asks it to fulfil its mandate of law beyond nation state sovereignty regarding environmental destruction.
Like poor Cassandra, who was cursed with seeing the future but unable to convince anyone of what she saw, Rosemary Radford Ruether has for almost half a century indicted our species for the capital crime of ecocide.
Even the people of Bikini like Americans, despite the ecocide nuclear testing wrought on their atoll.
Presenting climate change as the most significant problem facing humanity (as opposed to recognizing climate change and ecocide as outgrowths of a more deeply rooted exploitative and coercive political-economic system and way of life), the film again and again attributes responsibility for the present crisis to the fossil fuel industry.
5) This does not seem to be the case with viewers' reactions to Avatar when they are claiming the traumatic experiences of genocide and ecocide as theirs to some degree, making these claims very problematic.
In "The Systemic Approach, Biosemiotic Theory, and Ecocide in Australia"
The issue of humans' dismissal, oversight, and ecocide of trees ties to and is reflected by scholarly oversights of the ecocritical significance of the central "tree" figure, "the Rood," in the poem "The Dream of the Rood.
We need to develop a more comprehensive ecological ethics to avoid biocide or ecocide.
Many people fear that ecocide has now come to overshadow nuclear war and emerging diseases as a threat to global civilization.
In my view, while each issue chapter presents an accomplished survey of the field, the best are found toward the latter half of the book: Chapter 8 on ecocide, or the environmental impacts of militarism, and Chapter 9 on the need for a convention around invasive alien species.
If humanity ever stood capable of an ecocide - destroying the entire eco-system, it's today.