echolocation


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Related to echolocation: Human echolocation

ech·o·lo·ca·tion

(ek'ō-lō-kā'shŭn),
Term applied to the method by which bats direct their flight and avoid solid objects. The creatures emit high-pitched cries that, though inaudible to human ears, are heard by the bats themselves as reflected sounds (echoes) from objects in their path.

echolocation

the means by which objects are identified through echoes returned from very high frequency sound emissions. Bats use such a system to avoid objects in flight and to locate prey, as do toothed whales and dolphins.
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We have characterized the spatial resolution of novice and expert human echolocation using size discrimination and novel, relative spatial localization tasks.
phyllotis observed elsewhere in the southwestern USA, we conclude that the echolocation calls described here were emitted by I.
Daniel, who at 43 has been using echolocation since childhood and teaches it across the globe, held workshops for around 50 students on the Rehabilitation of Blind and Partially Sighted People diploma course.
Using echolocation, a big brown bat can swoop down, capture a bug, and eat it-all in about 2 seconds.
The Odontoceti--toothed dolphins and whales that hunt fish, squid, and other prey--evolved parallel abilities with bats, actively using clicks and pulsed sounds for underwater echolocation.
Griffin DR, Webster FA and Michael CR: The echolocation of flying insects by bats.
Echolocation systems are one of Nature's extremely successful specializations.
He presented an array of echolocation signals and communication calls from a digital library of species-specific sounds while recording miniature voltage spikes from neurons -- first in the left side and then the right side of the same bat.
Echolocation is the process of obtaining information about the animal environment system from relations between a pulse, a perceiver-generated wave front coming directly to the perceiver ear from its source, and its echo, that same sound arriving at the ear after reflection from the object or surface.
The presentation will explain cave formation, the use of caves by bats as day refuges, echolocation, and the animals that share the cave with the bats.
Griffin called the bats' special system echolocation.
Some, like the black-and-white spotted bat, found at Lake Piru and Yosemite, have ears like satellite dishes, the better to hear their own echolocation squeaks.