echolocation

(redirected from echolocate)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to echolocate: Biosonar

ech·o·lo·ca·tion

(ek'ō-lō-kā'shŭn),
Term applied to the method by which bats direct their flight and avoid solid objects. The creatures emit high-pitched cries that, though inaudible to human ears, are heard by the bats themselves as reflected sounds (echoes) from objects in their path.

echolocation

the means by which objects are identified through echoes returned from very high frequency sound emissions. Bats use such a system to avoid objects in flight and to locate prey, as do toothed whales and dolphins.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
A third level of interpretation can examine the frequencies at which bats echolocate.
When the same experiment was carried out with sighted control people who did not echolocate, these individuals could not perceive the objects, and neither did their brain show any echo-related activity, suggesting visual brain areas play an important role for echolocation in blind people.
Finally, to compare the sighted participants' performance to that of an expert, we enlisted an echolocator (EB, to maintain his anonymity) who has been totally blind since infancy, taught himself to echolocate during childhood, and now teaches echolocation to individuals who are blind and sighted.
By virtue of being mobile when they echolocate, dolphins are able to perceive objects from multiple points of view.
But the well-preserved fossils reveal the primitive bat's inner ear was small, which suggests that it could not echolocate.
Choose from many projects such as Radio Wave Emissions from Your Computer, Echolocate the Ocean Floor, and Extract DNA from Animal Tissue.
Supersensitive hearing lets wax moths eavesdrop on bats that squeak out calls at frequencies up to 212 kilohertz to echolocate prey, the researchers report in the August 23 Biology Letters.
Dolphins have this ability to echolocate by sonar, very similar to bats.
Micro-CT scans reveal new findings about bat echolocation Researchers from five international institutions, including the ROM, published a study in the prestigious journal Nature earlier this year that sheds new light on the way bats echolocate.
In searching for moths, barbastelles echolocate at about the 94 decibel level, roughly the equivalent of a busy highway, Goerlitz reports.
Washington, January 25 (ANI): In a new international study, scientists have used 3D imaging to shed new light on the way bats echolocate.
The consensus seemed to suggest that bats learned to echolocate (use sonar to determine their location in space) first--presumably while sitting on tree branches--and only later learned to fly.