echolalia


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echolalia

 [ek″o-la´le-ah]
stereotyped repetition of another person's words or phrases, seen in some cases of schizophrenia, particularly in catatonic schizophrenia, in Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome, and in neurological disorders such as transcortical aphasia.

ech·o·la·li·a

(ek'ō-lā'lē-ă),
Involuntary parrotlike repetition of a word or sentence just spoken by another person. Usually seen with schizophrenia.
[echo + G. lalia, a form of speech]

echolalia

/echo·la·lia/ (ek″o-la´le-ah) stereotyped repetition of another person's words and phrases.

echolalia

(ĕk′ō-lā′lē-ə)
n.
The repetition of words or phrases spoken by others, often occurring in people with autism spectrum disorder and certain other mental disorders.

ech′o·la′lic (-lĭk) adj.

echolalia

[ek′ōlā′lyə]
Etymology: Gk, echo + lalein, to babble
1 (in psychiatry) the automatic and meaningless repetition of another's words or phrases, especially as seen in schizophrenia. A kind of echolalia is delayed echolalia.
2 (in pediatrics) a baby's imitation or repetition of sounds or words produced by others. It occurs normally in early childhood development. Also called echophrasia, echo speech. echolalic, adj.

echolalia

Neurology The parroting by a Pt of another person's words or speech fragments

ech·o·la·li·a

(ek'ō-lā'lē-ă)
Involuntary parrotlike repetition of a word or sentence just spoken by someone else; usually seen in schizophrenia.
Synonym(s): echophrasia.
[echo + G. lalia, a form of speech]

echolalia

The involuntary, parrot-like repetition of words or phrases, spoken by another person. Echolalia may occur as a feature of schizophrenia or as part of a severe tic disorder.

Echolalia

Involuntary echoing of the last word, phrase, or sentence spoken by someone else or sound in the environment.
Mentioned in: Tourette Syndrome

ech·o·la·li·a

(ek'ō-lā'lē-ă)
Involuntary parrotlike repetition of something just spoken by another person.
[echo + G. lalia, a form of speech]

echolalia (ek″ola´leə),

n an uncontrollable reiteration of a word or phrase recently stated by another individual.
References in periodicals archive ?
Journals reflected that the child was verbal but his speech was just echolalia and does not include any situation specific request or comprehensible sentence.
Also Ben had echolalia, which is when they repeat everything that is said, parrot fashion," she continues.
Sometimes it seems a national echolalia has taken hold, with a handful of incessantly repeated terms cycling through and dominating.
Examples of echolalia include repetition of words, such as "I'm fine, I'm fine.
Stereotyped or repetitive speech, motor movements, or use of objects; (such as simple motor stereotypies, echolalia, repetitive use of objects, or idiosyncratic phrases).
Piper showed indications of this echolalia and its highly developed automatism as a consequence.
Se obtuvieron 190 documentos que relacionaban la palabra "Tourette" con 13 terminos: linguistics, communication disorders, speech, language, stuttering, cluttering, dysfluency, coprolalia, echolalia, palilalia, coprographia, coprophenomena, phonic tics.
In children with ONH, there are additional characteristics of ASD beyond those attributable to visual impairment alone, such as echolalia and stereotypic motor movements.
There are many common symptoms of autism, including language delay, sensory issues, self-stimulation, echolalia, spinning, hyperactivity, lining things up, tantrums, poor eye contact, limitations in social skills, speech difficulties, intestinal problems, and food sensitivities.
It is characterized by social disconnectedness, failure to recognize and read the subtleties of human communication behaviours and interactions, an obsessive addiction to routines and repeatable behaviours, and what psychiatrists call meaningless no contextual echolalia, the repetitions of sentences and words without regard to their significance or the context in which they are spoken.
He exhibited echolalia and unintelligible speech, which he used to request objects and attention from adults.